WITHIN THE VINES©
The Quickel Line:  2nd Generation American Johannes "John" Quickel,
Home----
To Bentz Title Page
To York and Our York Countians
Our Pennsylvanians Title Page
To Our American Immigrants
Copyright and Terms of Use
Email Webmistress

1 Johannes John QUICKEL1,2,3,4
 
Birth: 9 Jun 17625,6,7
Bapt: Strayer's (Salem) Lutheran Church Lancastar County, Penna
Father: Michael [Johann /John Michael]  QUICKEL (1721-1787)
Mother: Barbara  [Widow Bohner] SNAVELY (-1802)
John was mentioned in his father's will, & Executor of his mother's 
Death: 13 Feb 1831, (East) Manchester Twp, York, Penna5,6,8
Burial: Quickel's Church, York County, PA. [Tombstone] 
Alias: John in fathers will.//General Surname Quickle is sometimes Quikel in the records of Quickels church9
Spouse: Elizabeth Brenneman (1763-1830)  [More on Elizabeth] Children of Elizabeth Brenneman and John Quickel 
Occupation:  12 yearsJustice of the Peace, York County; Stonecutter
  • Johannes Quickel moonlighted as a stonecarver, and his work is both beautiful and identifiable, utilizing a style specific to this artist, and  providing  lovely examples of Fractur lettering and Pennsylvania Dutch folk art motifs  evident in several York County cemeteries. I am indebted to the work of Barry Rauhauser in his study of  John Quickel' s stonework and this artist's life circumstance. I received permission from him to post it online. Mr Rauhauser is now employed as Stauffer Curator of the Lancaster County Historical Society.  To the right is the stonework done by John Quickel and placed above the home he shared with Elizabeth Brenneman Quickel, his wife. Photo by Barry Rauhauser and used with his permission. 
Spouse: Elizabeth** [Elisabetha] BRENNEMAN13,4,6,5
Birth: 12 Jun 1763, of Conestoga, Lancaster, Pa
Death: May 1830, York County, Penna 
of Hemmorhage After Carrying A Bucket Of Water
Father: Christian BRENNEMAN (1735-1771)
Mother: Anna HERR (~1746-)
Marr: 1783, Lancaster, Penna15
Children: [More Detail on each Child available in Link] 
  • John (Died as Infant) (1783-1784)
  •  John Henry john [Johannes] (1785-1855)
  •  Elizabeth (1787-1890)
  •  Susanna (1790-1873)
  •  Anna Barbara Anne Barbara (1792-1876)
  •  Michael (1794-1846)
  •  Jacob (1797-1811)
  •  George [Georg] (1799-1845)
  •  Christian (twin) (Twin) (1802-1882)
  •  Anna (twin)** Annie (Twin) (1802-1882)
  •  Catharine (1805-1848)
  •  Henry (1807-1897)

Link to Page of Quickel Stonework [Images]
Link to Barry Rauhausers study of the Stonework and its creator with his photos from that site

Mentioned as Son John in his father's will.

Pennsylvania-Dutch folk art is often identified by its bold lines, its use of primary
colors, and the repetition of motifs such as hearts,tulips, geometric suns, and
trees-of-life. The 19th century graveyards of rural York County, Pennsylvania with
their carved tulips  and hearts and fraktur lettering give testament to the overwhelming
infiltration of the folk-art behind the culture. Yet behind all of this apparent unity
within the community and its folk art lies the individual artisan. Pennsylvania -
Dutch folk art is more than just the recreation of a remembered culture from the
artisans Palatinate past. The folk art motifs and images which are found carved into
the sandstone markers of the early nineteenth century were a new creation based
upon the craftsmens perception of the amalgamated culture in the Americas and his
place within this culture. As an example, Johannes Quickel moonlighted as a gravestone
carver in York County from 1789 until his death in 1831.
A second-generation craftsman whose family originally settled in Lancaster county but
moved west as more land became available,John Quickel was separated both from the
Palatinate culture his parents left behind, but also from many of the original craftsmen
which the earlier settlements in America would have produced. In a close examination
of John Quickels life and the gravestone carvings he created, a subtle and silent dialogue
emerges between the artists personal aesthetics, the immediate ethnic culture around  him,
and the larger, Anglo-American culture of the new nation. 86
 

John Quickel was born in 1762 and baptized at Strayers Church on July 27, 1763. Michael Quickel willed to his son the 200 acres of land which he owned, (the son)  John did not accept the conditions of his fathers will and purchased 75 acres to the east of his fathers land in 1787....adjacent to his fathers farm and the church.... (At the age of 14 and) in 1776 he marched part of the way with his father with farmers turned infantry.  In August of 1776, Michael (johns father) led a group of volunteer farmers turned infantry into Philadelphia. According to reports from members of the Baer and Becker families, John Quickel, 14 years old, traveled with his father and his group of fighters but stayed behind at a relatives house in Lancaster while the men continued onward. .....Both of these documents are found at the Historical Society of York. Though crudely done, merely photocopied notes, both contained small tales passed along of Michael Quickels volunteer march which places John Quickel at the scene for at least part of the march to Philadelphia. 10In 1808 John Quickel is commissioned as Justice of the Peace for Manchester Township....John Quickel never appears in any of the tax records as a stonecutter, or weaver, or mason, or anything that one would normally connect with gravestone carving. John Quickel is usually found as Esquire in the tax records due to his 12 year career as a Justice of the Peace. However, John Quickel leaves behind some record suggesting that he was a stone carver. ... Being a Justice of the Peace, along with many positions of life at the time (like gravestone carving) were often side-jobs at best. Many early immigrants were occupying several stations in life at one time. In Johns case it is difficult to determine which he considered to be his main occupation, though the census records of the day show him as esquire, not as farmer or stone cutter. The notebook which John Quickel used at the time is the same notebook his father used to record the names and allowances of his fellow volunteers in his march of 1776 and still exists at the Historical Society of York. It reveals the day to day workings of John from 1810 until the book is filled in 1814. With the exception of the parts written by his father, it is entirely in cursive English.(3) .... Though much of the cases recorded by John are hum-drum, day-to-day squabbles over debts and labor disputes, there are the occasional cases which sound more like a television sit-com:
Before me the subscriber one of the justices of the peace in and for the county of York, personally came Benjamin Edward of the township of Manchester in the said county, who upon his solemn affirmation according to Law, said, that on this day being the eleventh Day of March at Mr. John Shiers Innkeeper in Manchester township foresaid, Thomas Bond of the same township, made an assauld up on this affirmant and then and there did violently beat and abuse him upon the head with an Iron handle of a stofe scraper until the blood ran from his head and demnd his black soul and that he would shood him.
  This appears to be nothing more than the 1811 version of a bar fight. The day itself must have been a pretty violent one, however, as Christina Borke of Newberry would report to John Quickel, Esq. three days later, on March 14th that:
Catharina King and husband George did follow this affirmant to the schoolhouse, and then and there did violently scold and abuse her, and calt her all the bad names and bat words that could be mentioned and lifted up his fist and that she is afeard of her live.
 In fact, life as a Justice of the Peace was all but hum-drum. There are a few other cases over the four years, reported directly to John Quickel, Esq., of various violent things occurring then and there which usually consisted of somebody hitting somebody else over the head with something. With all of this head hitting going on, the association of Justice of the Peace and gravestone carver may have been a frugal agreement.
In a labor dispute dated May 30, 1810, the notebook also gives us an idea of how sandstone was gathered and quarried in the earliest days of settlement:
Mr. Bond hath hiert there wagon and fore horses for four dollars per day and the said the wold hall as big a lods as Smeiser had that time when the came there for do make the bargin, and one of them was to stay in the woods and biig ang gether and quarry stones and help to lod the wagon and he was to have three quarter dollars per day for doing that and Mr. Bond and the agreed the should come on Monday morning...

Though it is difficult to tell by the awkward language and the phonetic spellings, the basics are clear: sandstone was probably gathered just as much as it was quarried at this early time in the new settlement, and was as much of an attempt at clearing the land as much as it was a desire to earn a profit from the stone. Certainly this changes over time and quarries, particularly on your own farmland, were established.
This passage from 1810, when compared to passages from later dates, also illustrates clearly John Quickels increasing grasp of the English language. Slowly, over the three years John keeps records in the notebook, his grammar and spelling improve.
What this notebook doesnt tell us, unfortunately, is anything about John Quickel, the German stone-cutter. As per the government, which ordered all legal documents to be in English, Johns first language is only revealed by the phonetic spellings which occur in the earliest years of his work as a Justice. It does not offer us, nor have I found anywhere, a hint as to how John Quickel received an education or his affection for the law. Nor does it contain any mention of anything at all personal to John, save for a small scrap of paper between the pages, a receipt from John Rutt which reads:
Recd, April 8th, 1825 from John Quickel gaurtian for Rebecca Frey for one table & two chairs the sum of one dollar eight one cent.
 Though the notebook is filled by 1814, John Quickel continues his post at Justice of the Peace until 1820. In 1824 he builds his first stone house on his lot of land. This house, which still stands, nearly propped up by a major four-lane highway, is a two story sandstone house and sandstone and wood barn about 1/2 mile north-east of the church(Fig 5). On the southern gable of the barn is a datestone which imitates his gravestones with a worn-down twelve point sun. On the western gable of this house is a another wonderful display of Quickels carving ability. Under two suns and a trio of tulips springing out of a vase appears the phrase, both in German and English, Built by John Quickel and his wife Elizabeth - 1824. (Fig. 6) 10

Regarding father Michaels and mother Barbaras  will: Michaels was proved July 29, 1788.  His wife is Barbara and his
children are ....John...and (see fathers entry for additional info)
Barbara's will was proved June 29, 1802.  Also of Dover Twp., she lists the following children:  ....John ....11 (see motherss entry for additional info)
In Church Records: Selected Areas of PA 1600s-1800s, York County, Vol 3, Staryer's (Salem) Lutheran Church he is present as : Johanes Qwickel of Michael and Barbara Qwickel born June 9 1762, Baptized.
There is some disagreement regarding the first two children of Maria Elizabeth and Johannes Quickel.  Some say that the second son's name was simply John. 4,12
 
 
 

Barry R Rauhauser has done extensive study of gravestone carving in German Penna tradition and has detailed the work of John Quickel. The information below is lifted from his informative, detailed site at: http://members.nbci.com/BRRauhauser/spring98.htm  In the entire work he looks at the evolution of carving of stones, and the emergence of a strong Germanic tradition with Fractur writing, using Johann Quickels work as the primary example of that art. The photos which accompany the text are viewable in the multimedia window, likewise, credit for them is due again to Barry Rauhauser.  The excerpt begins after a discussion of James Kellys work.
The stones of John Quickel (Photos #4, #5) appear in great contrast alongside the stones of James Kelly. Kellys stones are white marble, plain, and though in German, are still carved in a plain typeface. Quickels stones are brown sandstone with hearts and tulips or suns and always fraktur lettering. John Quickels father, Michael Quickel, came to America from Germany and landed in Philadelphia on July 25, 1736. Michael settled in the Conestoga Valley in Lancaster County, remained until 1763, at which time he purchased 200 acres of land in what is now Conewago Township, just east of Dover. In 1770, Michael Quickel gave more than 2 acres to the Lutheran and Reformed church which sat at the southwest corner of his original 200 acres. This church became known as Quickels Church. A well-respected man in the community, Michael helped teach the local children at Quickels Church. In 1776, as a Captain, Michael led a group of volunteer soldiers to Philadelphia.
John Quickel, his son, was born in 1762 and baptized at Strayers Church on July 27, 1763. Michael Quickel willed to his son the 200 acres of land which he owned. John did not accept the conditions of his fathers will and purchased 75 acres to the east of his fathers land in 1787.  John was probably an educated man, though Ive found no record of his education.
  In the cemetery that sits across the road from Quickels Church are many stones matching the John Quickel stones found at Strayers church. As a cross check, I sampled a variety of the sandstone gravemarkers from this yard and searched for the matching estate records of the interred. (Table 2) The full list of all stones sampled can be seen in Data Table 1, in the back, and are distinguished by a Q in the Cem. column  (Editors note: I included the authors tables below and at the end of the text)
    Like James Kelly, John Quickel also appears to have a long and varied carving career. The stones in the Quickel yard are much more varied than one would conclude by examining the few stones located at the Strayers Church cemetery. John Quickels carving must have begun about the time of his fathers death  and continued until his own death in 1831.
The sampling of stones from the Quickel yard shows the variety which John Quickel carved. Beginning with the simple, all capital-lettered, plain type, fieldstone which he carved for his father, John Quickel then moves into a period of small, undecorated, quarried sandstone markers, and then into his later years with the sun, tulips, hearts and fraktur lettering. Large variations can also be noticed within each of the three main styles. (Photos #6, #7, #8)
Oddly enough, John Quickel never appears in any of the tax records as a stonecutter, or weaver, or mason, or anything that one would normally connect with gravestone carving. John Quickel is usually found as Esquire in the tax records due to his 12 year career as a Justice of the Peace. However, John Quickel leaves behind some record suggesting that he was a stone carver.
Table 3: from John Quickels Inventory Appraisal
to two Stone Jocks .75
to a books and stone cutting tools .75
to Hammer, anvill, Tom Hock, pincher, chisel & stone wedges .75
to a lot of Himm & prayer books 2.50
    This list of tools (Table 3) certainly points to John Quickel as being able to carve some form of stone, but it is house that points to the gravestones. John Quickels stone house, built in 1824, still stands on Canal Road in East Manchester Township, only a half mile east of Quickels Church. There is a date stone on the western gable of Quickels house (Photo #9) which uses a similar tulip motif as that found on many of the stones in both the Quickel and Strayer cemeteries. Though the datestone on the house uses a vase rather than a heart, the suns alongside the tulips and the shapes of the tulips match the carvings on the gravestones. The English translation on the datestone was probably done by John Quickel. Being a Justice of the Peace meant writing many documents in English. After examining the case records from Quickels term as Justice of the Peace, I can definitely state that the man was fluent in English. #4 There is also a datestone on the barn using the sun motif.
   In his administration account, John Quickels estate pays his son George Quickel for one tombstone.(Fig. 10) This stone rests in the Quickels Church cemetery; a sun motif, brown sandstone with fraktur lettering. There is also a stone in the Strayers yard which is connected by an administration account to George Quickel. George Quickels vendue list also includes two grave stones which are sold to Michael and Christian Quickel.(Fig. 11) Obviously, George is continuing his fathers work, but not with the same variety or longevity. Many of the fraktur-lettered stones in the Quickel yard which appear after 1831 are void of symbols and only retain their brown color and fraktur lettering as a match to John Quickels. This lack of variety on Georges part may have been due to his own lack of longevity. George dies in 1845, at the age of 46, leaving behind several children. The oldest child would have only been 14 at the time. The Quickel carving history ends with George.
    The discussion of the Quickel carvers cant be concluded without also noting the portions of the written record which do not point to a Quickel as the carver. In my opinion, these are momentarily unexplainable anomalies to an otherwise perfect case for the Quickels as carvers. However, the written record does point wherever it will.
One of the problems with the Quickels case is found on the stone of Barbara Spahr, dated 1823, and found at Strayers Church (Photo #11). This stone could have been produced within John Quickels lifetime and the stone carries with it all the standard Quickel characteristics. However, no probate record for Barbara Spahr can be found since she would have died before her husband, George Spahr. In the probate records of George Spahr, there are two greave stones mentioned, his own and his wifes. (Fig. 12) The stone for himself is purchased from George Quickel. George Spahr dies in 1830, and given George Quickels ability to copy his fathers work and his fathers age at the time, there is little doubt that this stone was carved by George Quickel.
  But George Spahrs estate also pays Melchoir Benedick for a stone for Barbary Spahr, indicating his wife. This would indicate a stone that is otherwise identical to the works of John Quickel.(Photo #11) The explanation may be lost with time. George Spahr may have been repaying Benedick for a stone that had previously been carved by John and purchased by Benedick.
Another problem lies in the stones at Quickels Church which contain Quickels sun motif carved into marble. (Photo #12) Only one administration account has been located for these stones. This single account indicates that James Kelly was paid for the stone. Here again, at the moment, the story is lost. Kelly could have copied the work of Quickel with enough skill. He could have even used some of the same stencils. Better still, John Quickel may have carved the stone for Kelly. None of these possibilities should otherwise detract from the evidence which supports John and George Quickel as the carvers of many of the gravestones in the area After John Quickel dies, and especially after George Quickel dies, the use of sandstone, fraktur lettering, and Germanic folk-motifs drops rapidly from the faces of the gravestones. The final two carvers, for which I have found more than one mention in the probate records, are Michael Christ and John Minter. Both appear to be marble carvers  who use more dominant, widespread cultural symbols (fans or willow and urns) or no symbols at all. Both have something greater in common, however, and that is their locations to the west of the Dover area.
Michael Christ does not leave much information behind. The Pennsylvania census for 1800 indicates a Michael Christ living in Paradise Township to the west of Dover and the 1820 census shows a Michael Christ residing in Menallen Township in Adams County. The tax records of 1800 for Paradise Township show a Michael Christ as a small land owner. By 1804, Michael Quickel is listed as a weaver. The connection of weaver and gravestone maker is not uncommon and occurs with John Frysinger, mentioned only one time in an estate record from 1809, who also is listed as a weaver in the tax records.
   John Minter is absent from many of the York County records. Like Christ, he ended up residing in the Adams County area. The Pennsylvania Census of 1820 lists a John Minter in Montgomery County and in 1840 lists John Minter in Franklin Township in Adams County. Boyds Business Directory of 1860 lists John Minter as a marble worker in Hanover with a shop at the corner of Carlisle and Chestnut. #5 Both Minters and Christs stones must have been brought in from much greater distances to the west. When George Quickel dies, his estate purchases a stone from Minter.
Which comes first? The carver or the culture? If I would have answered that question last semester I would have chosen culture. I assumed that the individual on the deathbed would have been controlling the characteristics of the stones prior to 1850. Therefore, the carver appeared to me as a servant to the regional culture and to the individual and was somehow anonymous both in signature and influence.
Just as Aries had also discovered, after examining many of the available wills, I found no demands placed on the executors other than a burial in a Christian-like manner and the occasional befitting social graces and always at the discretion of the executors. #6 If the individual did select a style of stone, it is not found in their wills, and was probably done so informally. One of the carvers, John Quickel, changes his style dramatically over the years and from stone to stone. This demonstrates that, to John Quickel at least, there was individuality in the carving of a stone. Though the individuality and symbols may have been influenced by culture, there are still elements of the carvings which remained independent of any dominant culture.
But the characteristics of the tombstones are not controlled solely by the time periods regional culture of death or the carvers artistic interpretations. Economy also would have controlled these characteristics. The gravestones are influenced by the availability of material and a carvers talent. The culture, the carver, and the economy, mesh into a single tangible unit; the gravestone. Without examining the written record, as I did last semester, I could only guess at the economy, and only imagine the carvers behind the stones. This left two broad areas of darkness without any light switches. .....
    The people at Strayers were not paying more money to have sandstone, but they were paying more money to maintain their culture through the German folk art and fraktur lettering. The best example of this can be seen with the Quickel/Kelly marble stones which appear at the Quickels Church cemetery. The one available administration account for a marker of this type from 1815 gives a price of $43.25. This means it cost three times as much to have both marble and the Germanic cultural elements in the same stone.
The folk art's relevance to the German culture is easy enough to visually deduce. Even last semester, I knew that the folk art was a distinctly German element in the stones of carvers such as John Quickel. The importance of fraktur lettering as a German cultural element can only be understood when one looks at a copy of Yorks German Gazette from the time period. Both John Quickels and George Spahrs obituaries were printed in the German Gazette. However, the papers from these dates are no longer extant. After seeing copies of the German Gazette, printed in a fraktur lettering similar to John Quickels, I now view the lettering not as decoration but as a symbol of Germanic culture.
There was much more tension between the German immigrants and the dominant Anglican culture of America than I had perceived. The first marker in Strayers cemetery that uses fraktur lettering is dated 1808. Before this, the carvers were probably skilled enough to carve in fraktur, yet it does not appear. Mounting tension between the cultures, though possibly unconscious and peaceful, may have caused this increase in the use of fraktur lettering. Originally, I viewed the fraktur-lettered stones as the direct-from-Germany culture; I viewed their disappearance as assimilation without a struggle. I now believe that this fraktur lettering was a reaction to the assimilation.
This cultural tension can best be seen in John Quickels stones. Though most of the fraktur-lettered markers are those carved by John Quickel, he himself undergoes a change in lettering styles. By examining the estate records and markers of Quickels Church, Ive found that John Quickel does not begin to carve in fraktur until about 1802. Many of his earlier stones are still beautifully carved, but are in standard capital letters. John Quickel may have been copying the fraktur from an old family bible, or he may have been copying from issues of Yorks German Gazette. Either way, he used the fraktur lettering not out of fashion, but out of an effort to maintain a culture. John Quickels use of fraktur and folk art motifs increased as the years passed and as the assimilation of the German culture continued.
John Quickel demonstrates the importance of the carver. As the popular carver of what I now view as stubbornly German" markers, John Quickel becomes not just a carver, but a stronghold of German culture. When John Quickel died in 1831, a small segment of the German immigrant culture died with him. Even in the Quickels Church cemetery, there are few, if any, folk art motifs after 1831. The fraktur-lettered stones which appear after this date are carved by George Quickel and others who are mimicking the style of John Quickel, yet they are no match for the dominant culture or the rapidly assimilating German culture.
This also demonstrates the importance of generational changes occurring in a culture. Last semester, I found a big generational culture leap due to the use of English in the schools in Dover. Within ten years, the German language disappears from the markers at Strayers cemetery. With John and George Quickel, we see the same thing on a micro-level. In this case, the disappearance of an important cultural element, the German folk-art on tombstones, occurs in the exhale of a breath.
Another overlooked aspect in last semesters study was the influence of canals. In an interview with the present owner of the Quickel house, Paul Fuller, I accidentally discovered this influence on the Dover area. Mr. Fuller stated that a canal was planned along the Conewago in the early 1800s. The investors of this canal had shipped in large quantities of sandstone into the area, but had gone out of business before anything was ever built. According to Fuller, these stones were then used by many of the local residents to build houses and barns. To Mr. Fuller, this explained the variegated coloring on many of the areas old stone houses.
Ive found absolutely nothing concrete to verify this story. It may be nothing more than rural myth. The area itself is broad enough to explain some of the variation of color of sandstone. However, Ive found no evidence which denies his claim. In fact, according to William Shank, in The Amazing Pennsylvania Canals, many upstart companies were trying to build side canals which led into the Susquehanna, but had run out of money. The Conewago streams, which ironically parallel Canal Road next to the Quickel house, would have been a perfect site for a canal since they would have led into the Conewago Falls Canal along the Susquehanna.
The people of the Dover area must have been acquainted with the canal systems in the Susquehanna. Balzer Hamme, one of the men with a Quickel stone in Strayers cemetery, was a trade merchant who trafficked goods between Pittsburgh, Philadelphia and Baltimore. Hamme was probably using the Susquehanna and its canals to take goods to Baltimore. The overall influence of the canals before railways can also be seen from an advertisement by Byrnes and Co. in the Gazette in Fig. 2.
The canals may not explain the colors of the sandstone in Dover, but it does explain the Minter stones, which come from Hanover, and the Christ stones, which also came from western areas. Before railway, east to west trade routes would have been established to take advantage of these canals and the Susquehanna River. Even though railway was established by the time of Minters appearance, the roadways and trade patterns had already been established, making Hanover as likely a place to obtain a tombstone as York. Depending on the availability of economically appropriate carvers in each area, Hanover may have been a better choice. Growing up with the availability of north to south Interstate Highways, the prevalence of east to west trade in the nineteenth century never even occurred to me.
  Now that Ive mentioned many of the things that I misconstrued by only examining the material record last semester, let me mention one thing I got right. As I said last semester, I dont agree with Barba about much of the symbolism which he suggests. The only symbolic importance I may have seen was that of the drooping tulip branches. #11 However, after seeing the folk art datestone on the Quickel house, I think even this is a bit of a stretch. The folk art stems from the home and the family and is symbolic of these. After viewing the stones at the Quickel cemetery, I now see the sun motif as an economical German cultural statement, rather than a transitional folk art motif. The real importance with the folk art, I believe now, is as its symbol of a German culture to a people who found their culture under stress.

The pictures accompanying John Quickels entry here are from this same website, from which the text in entirity was taken.

Table 1: Possible Carvers from the Probate Records
Year Carver Materia Motif Price
1795 Horn, Frederick 2 7 5..4..0
1806 Horn, Frederick 2 7 6..14..11
1809 Frysinger, John 4 4 3..15..0
1809 Smith, Henry 2 7 3..18..9
1813 Kelly, James 2 7 12.72
1815 Kelly, James 2 7 16.75
1819 Kelly, James 2 7 19.00
1819 Kelly, James 2 7 19.48
1820 Kelly, James 2 7 18.11
1822 Quickel, John 4 9 9.00
1825 Kelly, James 2 7 19.80
1826 Quickel, John 4 4 26.00
1828 Quickel, John 4 9 24.00
1830 Quickel, George 4 9 11.50
1833 Christ, W. or M. 2 10 18.00
1837 Christ, Michael 4 10 17.00

Table 2: Matching John Quickel records at Quickels Church
Date Interred Carver Material Motif Price Paid
1787 Quickel, Michael Quickel, John 4 caps 1..10..0
1804 Finck, Heinrich Quickel, John 4 4 1..17..6
1804 Cron, Johann Phillip Quickel, John 4 4 2..5..0
1806 Hoffman, Johann Phillip Quickel, John 6 4 6..15..0 for 2
1816 Benedick, George Quickel, John 4 4 21.84
1818 Miller, George Quickel, John 4 4 26.42
1823 Metzger, Willhelm Quickel, John 4 caps 58.25 for 3
1823 Wilt, John Quickel, John 4 4 16.25
 

Spouse: Elizabeth** [Elisabetha] BRENNEMAN13,4,6,5
Birth: 12 Jun 1763, of Conestoga, Lancaster, Pennsylvania14,5,15
Death: May 1830, York County, Penna Hemmorhage After Carrying A Bucket Of Water14,5
Father: Christian** BRENNEMAN (1735-1771)
Mother: Anna** HERR (~1746-)
Marr: 1783, Lancaster, Penna15
Children: 
John (Died as Infant) (1783-1784)
 John Henry john [Johannes] (1785-1855)
 Elizabeth (1787-1890)
 Susanna (1790-1873)
 Anna Barbara Anne Barbara (1792-1876)
 Michael (1794-1846)
 Jacob (1797-1811)
 George [Georg] (1799-1845)
 Christian (twin) (Twin) (1802-1882)
 Anna (twin)** Annie (Twin) (1802-1882)
 Catharine (1805-1848)
 Henry (1807-1897)

Image courtesy of and copyrightBarry Rauhauser 

Children:
John (Died as Infant) (1783-1784)
John Henry john [Johannes] (1785-1855)
Elizabeth (1787-1890)
Susanna (1790-1873)
Anna Barbara Anne Barbara (1792-1876)
Michael (1794-1846)
Jacob (1797-1811)
George [Georg] (1799-1845)
Christian (twin) (Twin) (1802-1882)
Anna (twin)** Annie (Twin) (1802-1882)
Catharine (1805-1848)
Henry (1807-1897)
 

1.1 John QUICKEL16
Birth: 3 Sep 1783, [Manchester Twp, York Co, Pa]14,17
Death: 19 Jun 178418,19
 

There is a John Mentioned in his grandmother Barbara Snavely Quickels will 11 Has to be the 2nd son John, as this one died an infant

1.2 John Henry john [Johannes] QUICKEL20

Birth: Oct 1785 [17 Oct 1785], [ Lancaster, Pennsylvania]21,22,23,24,25
Death: 185516
Bapt: Oct 1785, Quickel's Church, Conewago, York County, PA.26
Alias: Johannes in his baptismal entry//Quickel, Johannes in his marriage record26,27

They had seven children, which are listed by Barbara Buckman Christie on her Gedcom....with birthdates, Unsourced, which I include below. 28 There is a John mentioned in his grandmother Barbara Snavely Quickels will.11 Laura Morrison likewise names these children and states they were all born Dover Twp, York, Penna

Spouse: Anna Mary (Anna Maria CAR) KOHR29,30
Birth: 7 Apr 1787,  In Bethel, Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania7,7
Death: 27 Nov 18657
Marr: 31 May 1808, First Trinity Reformed, York, York County Penna27,15

Children: John (1812-)
 Jacob (1813-)
 Susan (1816-)
 Michael (1820-1890)
 Maria (1821-)
 Samuel (1824-1876)
 Catherine

1.3 Elizabeth QUICKEL26,4

Birth: Nov 1787 [12 Nov 1787], [Manchester Twp, York Co, Pa]31,32
Death: 6 Aug 189033,7
Bapt: Dec 1787, Quickel's Church, Conewago, York County, PA.26

Spouse: John KEUHN16,15
Birth: 1782, York, Pa7

1.4 Susanna QUICKEL26,34

Birth: 18 Jan 1790, [Manchester Twp, York Co, Pa]26,35,17
Death: 11 Nov 187316
Bapt: 1790 [14 Feb 1790], Quickel's Church, Conewago, York County, PA.36

1.5 Anna Barbara Anne Barbara QUICKEL26,37,16,38

Birth: April 1792 [8 Apr 1792],  Manchester Twp, York Co, Pa39,40,41
Death: 18767
Bapt: May 1792 [May 28], In Conewago, York Co42,43
Alias: Quickel, Anna Barbara [chids aunt]sponsor for this child [fathers sister]26

Around 1811, Ann Barbara, John Quickels 6th child, born in 1792, had an affair with an English still operator named Martin Duhling. After learning of Ann Barbaras pregnancy, Martin conveniently left town for Ohio, leaving Ann Barbara with an illegitimate boy whom she named Martin Duhling, Jr. This goes far beyond cultural tension, and no doubt would have influenced most German-American fathers opinions of the non-German speaking males of America. 10
If it (Martins illegitimate birth)  affected John (Martins grandfather Quickel) , he hardly let it show, unless it was the very cause of his increasingly elaborate tulip designs. In the Quickel history, David Quickel reports that Ann Barbara was disowned by the family, and indeed her name does not appear in Johns will. But she and Martin, Jr. lived with John until 1831, and of all of the grandchildren it is Martin, Jr. who walks in his grandfathers footsteps in both longevity and assumption of numerous community-oriented roles.Martin Duhling, Jr., a Quickel at heart, teaches school for 32 terms, makes pottery for 20 years, is a Justice of the Peace for 42 years, a Postmaster for 6, and aids in forming the York County Teachers Institute in 1854. For an illegitimate grandson, he certainly wasnt an outlet for any tension that his situation may have created. 10

Spouse: Martin DUHLING7,44
Birth: England45
Marr: Not Married

Children: Martin Luther (Lieutenant) (1820-1905)

1.6 Michael QUICKEL26

Birth: Aug 1794, [Manchester Twp, York Co, Pa]26,17
Death: 28 Feb 184646,47
Bapt: Sep 1794, Quickel's Church, Conewago, York County, PA.26

Sponsored his sisters child in baptism as found in Baptismal Records of Chris Lutheran Church, York, Penna p. 312 William A. 6 Mar 1821 son of Michael Benns and Anna  sponser: Michael Quickel48 (the brides Brother-this man)

Spouse: Catherine KRONE16
Birth: 21 Feb 180716

Children: Gideon (1827-)
 George (1829-)
 Anna Mary (1832-)
 Tobias (1835-)
 Leah Jane (1844-)
 
 
1.7 Jacob QUICKEL26,49

Birth: Feb 1797 [7 Feb 1797], [Manchester Tsp, York county, Penna]50,51
Bapt: Mar 1797, Quickel's Church, Conewago, York County, PA.26
Died 1811
Buried Quickel's Church, where he is shown son of John and 14 years of age. See image to right by Barry Rauhauser. 

1.8 George [Georg] QUICKEL52

Birth: Jun 1799, [30 Jun 1799 Newberry Twp,York Co., PA]53
Death: 9 Jul 1845,  Conewago Twp,York County, Pennsylvania54
Burial: Quickel's Cemetery, Conewago Twp.
Bapt: Aug 1799 [11 Aug 1799 ], Quickel's Church, Conewago, York County, PA.26,55

Georges father is responsable for many of the beautiful graves of Quickels church, and Barry Rauhauser informs, many of the stones still continue through the 1820s just as they always had, at least until 1831 when John Quickel, Esq. passes away. Johns son, George, and another man, Henry Rodes, take up John Quickels chisels for a time, carving similar but simpler designs while still using fraktur lettering. The two mens stones are nearly indistinguishable from Johns, save for the centering of the dates and the absence of the heart and tulip motif. By the mid-1840s (George dies in 1845), nearly all the elements of German design are gone from the stones, including the language, the fraktur and the folk-art motifs. 10
 

 George Quickels.... birth having occurred on the same farm in Pennsylvania where his son Jacob was born. George was a life-long farmer and the son of JOHN QUICKEL, who was born and lived all of his life in the same county in Pennsylvania. A lifelong farmer and the father of 8 children. ( From "History of Hamilton County, Indiana" 1915, Prof. J. F. Haines, Bowman & Co., Indianapolis. pp 877-878)  See son Jacobs bio for more on this family. Also See Barbara Christie Web Site Sourced to Ray Nagle and his book the Quickel Family  Ray is Available via Email28http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=barbgeni&id=I04014

Spouse: Susan GOOD54,56
Birth: 4 May 180654,57
Death: 25 Apr 1881, Newberry Township, York County, Pennsylvania.57,7
Father: John Stehman [Under Research] GOOD (1780-1829)
Mother: Mary Elizabeth [Under Research] KELLER (1783-)
Marr: 18 Mar 183054,16

Children: John A. (1831-1888)
 Elizabeth (1832-1918)
 Jacob (1834->1915)
 Anna (1836-<1915)
 Rudolph (1838-<1915)
 Elias (1840-<1915)
 Catherine (1842-<1915)
 Susan Emma (1845->1915)

1.9 Christian (twin) QUICKEL

Birth: 4 Dec 1802, Manchester Twp, York Penna58
Death: 24 Jan 1882/83, Manchester Twp, York Co, Pa15
Burial: Quickels Church Cemetery,  Conewago Twp.7
Bapt: 27 Feb 1803, Conewago twp, York Co., Pennsylvania.59

Twin to Anna
On line source states death date jan 24 1883 not 188228
There is a QUICKEL, CHRISTIAN in the 1850 Manchester Township, York County, Penna Fed Census

Spouse: Magdalena SHUYLER28,15
Birth: 1 Nov 180960,61
Death: 9 Apr 18997

Children: Sarah Anna (1828-1919)
 Adaline (1830-1865)
 Andrew (1832-1919)
 Henry S. (1833-1917)
 Lewis (~1835-1904)
 Elias (1837-1893)
 Amanda (~1839-1906)
 Daniel (-1916)
 William (1833-1844)
 Margaret E. (1848-1935)

1.10 Anna (twin)** Annie QUICKEL6,62

Birth: 5 Dec 1802, Manchester Twp, York Pa63,64
Death: 20 May 1882, York Penna65,66,67
Burial: Prospect Hill Cemetery, Old Section, York, York Co., Penna68
Bapt: 27 Feb 1803,  Conewago twp, York Co., Pennsylvania.15

Anna's twin was Christian who died Jan 24 1882.  Other children from Anna's Ma rriage to Michael Bentz:Sarah Anna 1819 William Hanna 1821, Michael Henry 1823 , Elizabeth Anna 1825, John 1826, A Son 1829, Peter 1830, Henry 1832, Anna 18366
Her tombstone inscription as transcribed by source reads a death date equal to her birthdate and so in in error. However, it shows the burial place for both her and her husband. Anna Bentz wife of Michael d 5 Dec 1802 .
Janes Grandmother confirms death date and place of burial69
____________________________
From notes from correspondant Janes Grandmother69
The Bentz's lived in York, at the second home west from Duke St. , on Market St.,. where the Yorktown Hotel now (1944) stands, where he died June 2,1856. She died May 20,1882, both were buried in Prospect Hill Cemetery, Old section.
____________________________
York Borough, South Ward, Penna Census 1850:
There is an Anna Bentz listed in the 1850 schedule married to Michael Bentz and with children enumerated:
Michael Bentz York Borough, South Ward for 1850 in the Federal 1850 census-Michael (setz?) 3 Oct enumerator
Michael 58
Anna 45
Peter 20
mary E 16  Attended school within the year
14 yo female name hard to read, should be Anna, looks like Celia.  Attended school within the year
William (middle initial illegible, H for Hanna?) 30 years Painter Deaf and some other qualifier illegible
Michael 28   cabinet maker  deaf and some other illegible qualifier
Erranda? Amanda? right after Michael...probably wife of William (named Amanda)  illegible female 26
Anna C? Illegible female 2 years old

In 1860, Annie Bentz appears in the following group
Annie Bentz    58   [Anna Quickel Bentz, now widowed with her son and daughter, and daughters children]
Peter   "      28  [would seem to be son Peter, but he should be 30, so this is not absolutely certain]
Mary E Stair   25  [Mary E Stair without her William Henry....has he died? Dtr Mary is not here, perhaps W H Is NOT dead]
Edward P  "     6    [Mary Es son Edward Philip Stair]
Annie Kate "    470  [Mary Es daughter Anna Kate Stair, the future Mrs. Swope].

in 1870 she is again found with her daughter and now living next door to son Peter:
1870 Census York borough, York County, Penna
Leber, In the 1st Ward, York Boro on page 540 of the 1870 Census is  found:
Annie Bentz  67   [Anna Quickel Bentz, living with her daughter and her daughters second husband, and daughters children both marriages]
Reuben Leber 38 Tanner & Currier  [Mary Es second husband]
Mary E Leber 35     [Mary Elizabeth Bentz Stair Leber]
David b Leber  1       [Mary Es last child mentioned in the family bible, and full name: David Bentz Leber]
Edward P Stair 16   [Mary Es son Edward Philip Stair]
Anna Kate 14           [Mary Es daughter Anna Kate Stair, the future Mrs. Swope].

Again, no mention of Mary in the census although she is found in the family bible, and who,  according to the bible married Alfred Hoonett.

Next door to this family though, is found Mary E Bentzs brothers family, Annie Bentzs son Peter:
Peter Bentz  39  Prof  Music
Ellen G  29  born MD
William S   7
Harry    4
Mary S   2
Mary Griffith  60 born MD
Elliza Jackson 45 born MD
William Kenny 15 born MD

Spouse: Michael** BENTZ26,6,62,71
Birth: 1 Apr 1790, York County Pa72,73
Death: 2 Jan 1858 or (June 2,1856),  York, in his home on Market street74,75
Father: Peter** [Hans Peter] [John Peter] [Johan Peter] BENTZ (1758-1823)
Mother: Anna Maria**Mary HUMICKHAUSEN (1761-1842)
Marr: 13 Apr 1818, [by Rev. Dr.Schmucker] [Christ Lutheran Church, York, York, Penna]76,77,78,79

Children: Sarah Anna (<1819-1898)
 William Hanna [William Amos] (1821-)
 Michael Henry (1823-1909)
 Elizabeth Anna (Died as Infant) (1825-1825)
 John (1826-1894)
 Son (Died as Infant) (1829-1829)
 Peter (1830-1884)
 Henry (Died as Child) (1832-1832)
 Maria Elizabeth** Mary (1834-1916)
 Anna (1836-1922)

1.11 Catharine QUICKEL80,81,7

Birth: 24 Sep 1805, Manchester Twp, York Co, Pa7
Death: 15 Oct 18487
Bapt: 17 Nov 1805,  Christened In Conewago, York Co15

They had the following children:
471 M i John A. HOOVER was born 28 Sep 1827.
John married Elizabeth BULL.
472 F ii Adaline HOOVER was born 6 Mar 1830. She died 6 May 1850.
473 M iii Lewis HOOVER was born 2 Aug 1836.7

Spouse: Daniel HOOVER7
Birth: 1800,  York, Pa7

Children: John A. (1827-)
 Adaline (1830-1850)
 Lewis (1836-)

1.12 Henry QUICKEL82

Birth: 25 Nov 1807,  York, Pa7
Death: 25 Aug 18977

Of their children, historical sketches writes
Henry was the second son and the fourth of the children.83
David S. had two brothers and three sisters, of whom he is the eldest. 84

They had the following children:
+ 474 M i David S. QUICKEL Dr.
475 F ii Ann QUICKEL was born 20 May 1840. She died 26 Jun 1929.
476 F iii Mary QUICKEL was born 22 Dec 1842. She died 9 Oct 1923.
Mary married Benjamin GOOD.
+ 477 M iv Henry H. QUICKEL7

Spouse: Magdalena STRICKLER7,85
Birth: 27 Jan 1817, York, Pa7
Death: 14 Nov 19017
Father: Christian STRICKLER (1774-1841)
Mother: Anna KELLER

Children: David S (Dr.) (1837->1886)
 Ann (1840-1929)
 Mary (1842-1923)
 Henry H. (1846->1886)
 Son
 Daughter
 
 

Sources

1. Will abstract, Michael Quickel
QUICKEL, Michael.  Dover Township.
July 10, 1785    July 29, 1788
Executors:  Henry Mathias and John Kochenour.
Wife:  Barbara Quickel.
Children:  John, Michael, Barbara m. ----
Krider, Elizabeth m. Michael Kreider, Maria m. Conrad Ensminger,
Catharine m. Jacob Barr, Anna, and Baltzer.
Stepson and daughter:  Henry Bohmer, and Mary m. Philip Miller.
From Rootsweb York County Will Abstracts.
2. Barbara , wife of Michael Quickel,  her Will abstract:
QUICKEL, Barbara.  Dover Township.
August 5, 1795    June 29, 1802
Executor:  John Quickel.
Children:  Anna m. Conrad Fry, Henry, Barbara m. Philip Miller, John, and Balthasser.
Grandchildren:  John and Ann (children of John), and Barbara Miller (child of Barbara).
Rootsweb York County Will Abstracts.
3. Old Family Bible (Keller Family Bible), Info provided to Donald McCurdy Swope by Amy Swope Wing from source cited, Mrs Keller of York, York County, Penna?, Donald McCurdy Swope citation.
4. Albert H. Gerberich, Brenneman History, The, Copyright 1938, reprinted 1988 By Selby Publ., Selby Publishing and Printin 3405 Zartman Rd, Kokomo, Indiana 46902, cited by source Barbara Christie <barbgeni@ix.netcom.com> Via Rootsweb World Connect Tree Entry, URL for Web pages below:, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=SHOW&db=barbgeni&surname=Alexander%2C+James+Herbert, 090900, page 263.
5. Web Pages entitled Ancestors of Richard Alan Lebo, The BRENNEMAN Line, http://aqua.dev.uga.edu/~lebo/brenneman_geno.html#IB, Mary Sue Branaman  SandiWon@aol.com     Brent Rhodes blrodes@shentel.net.
6. Old Family Bible (Keller Family Bible), Info provided to Donald McCurdy Swope by Amy Swope Wing from source cited, Mrs Keller of York, York County, Penna?
7. Laura Morrison, Sources apparant but link doesnt work, Quickel Descendants, http://www.laura.morrison.net/pafg12.htm#1536.
8. Ibid. east Manchester Twp.
9. Will abstract, Michael Quickel
QUICKEL, Michael.  Dover Township.
July 10, 1785    July 29, 1788
Executors:  Henry Mathias and John Kochenour.
Wife:  Barbara Quickel.
Children:  John, Michael, Barbara m. ----
Krider, Elizabeth m. Michael Kreider, Maria m. Conrad Ensminger,
Catharine m. Jacob Barr, Anna, and Baltzer.
Stepson and daughter:  Henry Bohmer, and Mary m. Philip Miller.
URL
http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/pa/york/wills/willabstrp-s.txt
10. Barry Rauhauser, The Individual Behind the Art, 1 Quickel, David. The Quickel History. York: York Historical Society, 1961. Except where noted many of the information regarding the history of the Quickel comes from this source., http://members.nbci.com/BRRauhauser/sp99.htm.
11. Rootsweb-Quiggle-L Thread. http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/QUIGGLE/1999-10/0939155128.
12. Barbara Bucknam Christie, online GEDcom/Homepage, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=barbgeni&id=I04014, 091000, Barbgeni@ix.netcom.com, http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/c/h/r/Barbara-E-Christie/, citing second source.
13. York County, Pennsylvania, 1765-1803: Quickel's (Zion) Lutheran and Reformed Church.  Lineages, Inc., comp. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000. Records transcribed from Family History Library copies of church records for this locality. For more information, see Family History Library Catalog (FHLC) #0020346.Located in Conewago Township in York County, Pennsylvania, Quickel's Church, also called Zion's Church, was organized in the 1760s. Its records date from 1765. The late William J. Hinke originally translated the records for the years 1765-1842 f rom German to English, and his manuscript has been microfilmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah. The records in this database span from 1755 to 1801 and include the names of more than 5,500 individuals.
Ancestry.com database [Elisabetha Quickel] mother to Anna Barbara.
14. Albert H. Gerberich, Brenneman History, The, Copyright 1938, reprinted 1988 By Selby Publ., Selby Publishing and Printin 3405 Zartman Rd, Kokomo, Indiana 46902, cited by source Barbara Christie <barbgeni@ix.netcom.com> Via Rootsweb World Connect Tree Entry, URL for Web pages below:, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=SHOW&db=barbgeni&surname=Alexander%2C+James+Herbert, 090900, pg 263.
15. Laura Morrison, On line Web pages: my ancestors. Appears to be sourced, but sources are not available on linking to them , large and comprehensive, frequently sited by others researching these lines, http://www.laura.morrison.net/laura.htm.
16. Barbara Bucknam Christie, online GEDcom/Homepage, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=barbgeni&id=I04014, 091000, Barbgeni@ix.netcom.com, http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/c/h/r/Barbara-E-Christie/, unsourced at location.
17. Laura Morrison, On line Web pages: my ancestors. Appears to be sourced, but sources are not available on linking to them , large and comprehensive, frequently sited by others researching these lines, http://www.laura.morrison.net/laura.htm, [Manchester Twp, York Co, Pa].
18. Albert H. Gerberich, Brenneman History, The, Copyright 1938, reprinted 1988 By Selby Publ., Selby Publishing and Printin 3405 Zartman Rd, Kokomo, Indiana 46902, cited by source Barbara Christie <barbgeni@ix.netcom.com> Via Rootsweb World Connect Tree Entry, URL for Web pages below:, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=SHOW&db=barbgeni&surname=Alexander%2C+James+Herbert, 090900, Source cited in mothers listing.
19. Barbara Bucknam Christie, online GEDcom/Homepage, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=barbgeni&id=I04014, 091000, Barbgeni@ix.netcom.com, http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/c/h/r/Barbara-E-Christie/, uncited source.
20. Will abstract, Michael Quickel
QUICKEL, Michael.  Dover Township.
July 10, 1785    July 29, 1788
Executors:  Henry Mathias and John Kochenour.
Wife:  Barbara Quickel.
Children:  John, Michael, Barbara m. ----
Krider, Elizabeth m. Michael Kreider, Maria m. Conrad Ensminger,
Catharine m. Jacob Barr, Anna, and Baltzer.
Stepson and daughter:  Henry Bohmer, and Mary m. Philip Miller.
URL
http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/pa/york/wills/willabstrp-s.txt gdson John, son of John.
21. York County, Pennsylvania, 1765-1803: Quickel's (Zion) Lutheran and Reformed Church.  Lineages, Inc., comp. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000. Records transcribed from Family History Library copies of church records for this locality. For more information, see Family History Library Catalog (FHLC) #0020346.Located in Conewago Township in York County, Pennsylvania, Quickel's Church, also called Zion's Church, was organized in the 1760s. Its records date from 1765. The late William J. Hinke originally translated the records for the years 1765-1842 f rom German to English, and his manuscript has been microfilmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah. The records in this database span from 1755 to 1801 and include the names of more than 5,500 individuals.
Ancestry.com database Oct 1785.
22. Albert H. Gerberich, Brenneman History, The, Copyright 1938, reprinted 1988 By Selby Publ., Selby Publishing and Printin 3405 Zartman Rd, Kokomo, Indiana 46902, cited by source Barbara Christie <barbgeni@ix.netcom.com> Via Rootsweb World Connect Tree Entry, URL for Web pages below:, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=SHOW&db=barbgeni&surname=Alexander%2C+James+Herbert, 090900, page 263? Father is sourced with wife and kids at 2nd source.
23. Barbara Bucknam Christie, online GEDcom/Homepage, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=barbgeni&id=I04014, 091000, Barbgeni@ix.netcom.com, http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/c/h/r/Barbara-E-Christie/, cites above source in fathers entry.
24. Laura Morrison, Sources apparant but link doesnt work, Quickel Descendants, http://www.laura.morrison.net/pafg12.htm#1536, christened 23 Oct 1785 in Conewago, York Co., Pennsylvania.
25. Laura Morrison, On line Web pages: my ancestors. Appears to be sourced, but sources are not available on linking to them , large and comprehensive, frequently sited by others researching these lines, http://www.laura.morrison.net/laura.htm,  Lancaster, Pennsylvania.
26. York County, Pennsylvania, 1765-1803: Quickel's (Zion) Lutheran and Reformed Church.  Lineages, Inc., comp. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000. Records transcribed from Family History Library copies of church records for this locality. For more information, see Family History Library Catalog (FHLC) #0020346.Located in Conewago Township in York County, Pennsylvania, Quickel's Church, also called Zion's Church, was organized in the 1760s. Its records date from 1765. The late William J. Hinke originally translated the records for the years 1765-1842 f rom German to English, and his manuscript has been microfilmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah. The records in this database span from 1755 to 1801 and include the names of more than 5,500 individuals.
Ancestry.com database
27. First Trinity Reformed Church, York County Penna. From York County, Pennsylvania Marriages, 1800-46: First Trinity Reformed Church. Lineages, Inc. comp.   [database  online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000. Records transcribed from Family History Library microfilm copies of church records for this locality. For more information, see Family History Library Catalog (FHLC) #0020356.
Located in the city of York in York County, Pennsylvania, Trinity Reformed Church, formerly called the First Reformed Church, was organized in the 1744 and began keeping records in 1745. The late William J. Hinke originally translated the records from German to English in 1937, and his manuscript has been microfilmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah. The marriage records in this database span the years 1801-46 and include the
 names of more than 5,400 individuals.
28. Barbara Bucknam Christie, online GEDcom/Homepage, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=barbgeni&id=I04014, 091000, Barbgeni@ix.netcom.com, http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/c/h/r/Barbara-E-Christie/.
29. First Trinity Reformed Church, York County Penna. From York County, Pennsylvania Marriages, 1800-46: First Trinity Reformed Church. Lineages, Inc. comp.   [database  online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000. Records transcribed from Family History Library microfilm copies of church records for this locality. For more information, see Family History Library Catalog (FHLC) #0020356.
Located in the city of York in York County, Pennsylvania, Trinity Reformed Church, formerly called the First Reformed Church, was organized in the 1744 and began keeping records in 1745. The late William J. Hinke originally translated the records from German to English in 1937, and his manuscript has been microfilmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah. The marriage records in this database span the years 1801-46 and include the
 names of more than 5,400 individuals. Anna Maria CAR.
30. Albert H. Gerberich, Brenneman History, The, Copyright 1938, reprinted 1988 By Selby Publ., Selby Publishing and Printin 3405 Zartman Rd, Kokomo, Indiana 46902, cited by source Barbara Christie <barbgeni@ix.netcom.com> Via Rootsweb World Connect Tree Entry, URL for Web pages below:, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=SHOW&db=barbgeni&surname=Alexander%2C+James+Herbert, 090900, page 263  Anna Mary (Anna Maria ).
31. Ibid. page 263-date.
32. Laura Morrison, Sources apparant but link doesnt work, Quickel Descendants, http://www.laura.morrison.net/pafg12.htm#1536, Manchester Twp, York Co, Pa and date.
33. Barbara Bucknam Christie, online GEDcom/Homepage, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=barbgeni&id=I04014, 091000, Barbgeni@ix.netcom.com, http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/c/h/r/Barbara-E-Christie/, uncited at source.
34. Albert H. Gerberich, Brenneman History, The, Copyright 1938, reprinted 1988 By Selby Publ., Selby Publishing and Printin 3405 Zartman Rd, Kokomo, Indiana 46902, cited by source Barbara Christie <barbgeni@ix.netcom.com> Via Rootsweb World Connect Tree Entry, URL for Web pages below:, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=SHOW&db=barbgeni&surname=Alexander%2C+James+Herbert, 090900, parents family is sourced at page 263.
35. Ibid. father is sourced page 263.
36. Laura Morrison, On line Web pages: my ancestors. Appears to be sourced, but sources are not available on linking to them , large and comprehensive, frequently sited by others researching these lines, http://www.laura.morrison.net/laura.htm, 14 Feb 1790.
37. Barbara , wife of Michael Quickel,  her Will abstract:
QUICKEL, Barbara.  Dover Township.
August 5, 1795    June 29, 1802
Executor:  John Quickel.
Children:  Anna m. Conrad Fry, Henry, Barbara m. Philip Miller, John, and Balthasser.
Grandchildren:  John and Ann (children of John), and Barbara Miller (child of Barbara).URL http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/pa/york/wills/willabstrp-s.txt Grddtr Anne, son of John.
38. A Biographical History of York County, Pennsylvania. n.p., 1886.//Ancestry.com database Bordered by the Susquehanna River in southeastern Pennsylvania, York County was formed in 1749 from neighboring Lancaster County. This database is a collection of biographical sketches of prominent men from the county in the nineteenth century Martin Luther Duhlings bio-calls her Barbara Quickel.
39. York County, Pennsylvania, 1765-1803: Quickel's (Zion) Lutheran and Reformed Church.  Lineages, Inc., comp. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000. Records transcribed from Family History Library copies of church records for this locality. For more information, see Family History Library Catalog (FHLC) #0020346.Located in Conewago Township in York County, Pennsylvania, Quickel's Church, also called Zion's Church, was organized in the 1760s. Its records date from 1765. The late William J. Hinke originally translated the records for the years 1765-1842 f rom German to English, and his manuscript has been microfilmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah. The records in this database span from 1755 to 1801 and include the names of more than 5,500 individuals.
Ancestry.com database April 1792.
40. A Biographical History of York County, Pennsylvania. n.p., 1886.//Ancestry.com database Bordered by the Susquehanna River in southeastern Pennsylvania, York County was formed in 1749 from neighboring Lancaster County. This database is a collection of biographical sketches of prominent men from the county in the nineteenth century Born in York County (Her sons bio).
41. Laura Morrison, Sources apparant but link doesnt work, Quickel Descendants, http://www.laura.morrison.net/pafg12.htm#1536,  Manchester Twp, York Co, Pa and date.
42. Ibid. 28 May 1792 In Conewago, York Co.
43. York County, Pennsylvania, 1765-1803: Quickel's (Zion) Lutheran and Reformed Church.  Lineages, Inc., comp. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000. Records transcribed from Family History Library copies of church records for this locality. For more information, see Family History Library Catalog (FHLC) #0020346.Located in Conewago Township in York County, Pennsylvania, Quickel's Church, also called Zion's Church, was organized in the 1760s. Its records date from 1765. The late William J. Hinke originally translated the records for the years 1765-1842 f rom German to English, and his manuscript has been microfilmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah. The records in this database span from 1755 to 1801 and include the names of more than 5,500 individuals.
Ancestry.com database May 1792.
44. A Biographical History of York County, Pennsylvania. n.p., 1886.//Ancestry.com database Bordered by the Susquehanna River in southeastern Pennsylvania, York County was formed in 1749 from neighboring Lancaster County. This database is a collection of biographical sketches of prominent men from the county in the nineteenth century Son Martin Luther Duhlings bio.
45. Ibid. his sons bio.
46. Barbara Bucknam Christie, online GEDcom/Homepage, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=barbgeni&id=I04014, 091000, Barbgeni@ix.netcom.com, http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/c/h/r/Barbara-E-Christie/, uncited source/parents family is sited at source detail below.
47. Albert H. Gerberich, Brenneman History, The, Copyright 1938, reprinted 1988 By Selby Publ., Selby Publishing and Printin 3405 Zartman Rd, Kokomo, Indiana 46902, cited by source Barbara Christie <barbgeni@ix.netcom.com> Via Rootsweb World Connect Tree Entry, URL for Web pages below:, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=SHOW&db=barbgeni&surname=Alexander%2C+James+Herbert, 090900, paretns are cited on page 263.
48. Evidences of the Bentz-Pentz Families in York County [PA] Before the Year 1850, By The Historical Society of York County: Henry James Young, A.B., Researcher (1935), http://www.pipeline.com/~richardpence/yorkpa.htm, viewed 051201, also http://www.swiss.ai.mit.edu/~bentz/geneal/bentz/yorkpa.htm.
49. Albert H. Gerberich, Brenneman History, The, Copyright 1938, reprinted 1988 By Selby Publ., Selby Publishing and Printin 3405 Zartman Rd, Kokomo, Indiana 46902, cited by source Barbara Christie <barbgeni@ix.netcom.com> Via Rootsweb World Connect Tree Entry, URL for Web pages below:, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=SHOW&db=barbgeni&surname=Alexander%2C+James+Herbert, 090900, unsourced at location.
50. York County, Pennsylvania, 1765-1803: Quickel's (Zion) Lutheran and Reformed Church.  Lineages, Inc., comp. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000. Records transcribed from Family History Library copies of church records for this locality. For more information, see Family History Library Catalog (FHLC) #0020346.Located in Conewago Township in York County, Pennsylvania, Quickel's Church, also called Zion's Church, was organized in the 1760s. Its records date from 1765. The late William J. Hinke originally translated the records for the years 1765-1842 f rom German to English, and his manuscript has been microfilmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah. The records in this database span from 1755 to 1801 and include the names of more than 5,500 individuals.
Ancestry.com database feb 1797.
51. Laura Morrison, On line Web pages: my ancestors. Appears to be sourced, but sources are not available on linking to them , large and comprehensive, frequently sited by others researching these lines, http://www.laura.morrison.net/laura.htm, 7 feb with date.
52. York County, Pennsylvania, 1765-1803: Quickel's (Zion) Lutheran and Reformed Church.  Lineages, Inc., comp. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000. Records transcribed from Family History Library copies of church records for this locality. For more information, see Family History Library Catalog (FHLC) #0020346.Located in Conewago Township in York County, Pennsylvania, Quickel's Church, also called Zion's Church, was organized in the 1760s. Its records date from 1765. The late William J. Hinke originally translated the records for the years 1765-1842 f rom German to English, and his manuscript has been microfilmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah. The records in this database span from 1755 to 1801 and include the names of more than 5,500 individuals.
Ancestry.com database Georg.
53. Laura Morrison, Sources apparant but link doesnt work, Quickel Descendants, http://www.laura.morrison.net/pafg12.htm#1536, [Manchester Twp, York Co, Pa] and date.
54. David Quickel, Quickel Family History, Ray Nagle (rnagle@abq.com) has the book,a/p Barbara Christie (see source 17/18)-his email is:, rnagle@abq.com.
55. Laura Morrison, Sources apparant but link doesnt work, Quickel Descendants, http://www.laura.morrison.net/pafg12.htm#1536, [11 Aug 1799 ].
56. Barbara Bucknam Christie, online GEDcom/Homepage, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=barbgeni&id=I04014, 091000, Barbgeni@ix.netcom.com, http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/c/h/r/Barbara-E-Christie/, unsourced.
57. Michael A. Smoke/Msmoke@msn.com   1-206-362-0504, Michael A.Smoke's FTM Home Page, http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/s/m/o/Michael-A-Smoke/index.html, viewed 042701, 1-206-362-0504, 1-425-486-6056, 13520 Linden Avenue N Apt. # 534  Seattle, WA 98133, Inconsistent but sometimes well sourced. Very well researched.
58. Laura Morrison, Sources apparant but link doesnt work, Quickel Descendants, http://www.laura.morrison.net/pafg12.htm#1536, http://www.laura.morrison.net/pafg12.htm#1536.
59. Laura Morrison, On line Web pages: my ancestors. Appears to be sourced, but sources are not available on linking to them , large and comprehensive, frequently sited by others researching these lines, http://www.laura.morrison.net/laura.htm, http://www.laura.morrison.net/pafg12.htm#1536.
60. Barbara Bucknam Christie, online GEDcom/Homepage, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=barbgeni&id=I04014, 091000, Barbgeni@ix.netcom.com, http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/c/h/r/Barbara-E-Christie/, 1809.
61. Laura Morrison, Sources apparant but link doesnt work, Quickel Descendants, http://www.laura.morrison.net/pafg12.htm#1536, 1 Nov 1809.
62. 1850 federal census, York Borough South Ward, Oct 1850, living with husband and in laws, via Genforum 1850 census.
63. Old Family Bible (Keller Family Bible), Info provided to Donald McCurdy Swope by Amy Swope Wing from source cited, Mrs Keller of York, York County, Penna?, 5 dec 1802.
64. Tom & Donna's Home Page, viewed 040101, http://www.gendex.com/users/hoffmast/seelig/index.htm, 4 dec 1802 Manchester Twp., York, PA.
65. Old Family Bible (Keller Family Bible), Info provided to Donald McCurdy Swope by Amy Swope Wing from source cited, Mrs Keller of York, York County, Penna?, 1882.
66. Email correspondance from Jane, researcher of Bentz line, relying on data from her grandmother and she basing research on John Bentz Hamme. Letter filed under Bentz Family in Reunion Folder. Janes email oliver1250@hotmail.com

This work bases research on notes by John Bentz Hamme in title, found in text under same[born 1862] where  it is said To him we are indebted for this long and interesting family history.
Please note many comments through text indicate this research was done in about 1944 so, as approaches later generations, could indicate contact with then living progeny and relatives of those detailed in the text. In addition the original information shows living status for several entries born as late as the 1870s.
The original work seems to be by John Bentz Hamme in entirity, and the Hamme lines might then be considered most secure

However, No source citations, are provided in source, and I found several minor errors in my direct lines, so Caveat Emptor

Reads in part (Regarding his parents as named and this child)
THE JOHN BENTZ DESCENDANTS AS COMPILED BY JOHN BENTZ HAMME....
(3)John Peter Bentz b. in W. Manchester Twp. September 8,1758 and died
in Conewago Twp. May 6,1823. He married Anna Maria Humerichouse,
daughter of John and Barbara Humerichouse, of Manchester Twp., York Co.,
Pa, where she was born August 13,1761. She died August 7,1842. They are
both buried in the old cemetery at Quickelís Church in Conewago Twp.,
York Co., Pa.

He served as a Private in the American Revolution, in Capt. Simon
Copenheaverís Company, First Battallion of York Co., Associators.  He
saw service with the Flying Camp in New Jersey about Perth Amboy. (see
Prowellís History, p. 273). He also was a private in Capt. Martin
Shetterís Co., Fifth Class, York Co., Militia for the year 1782, (see
Prowellís History,p. 273)

He drew pension in 1818. While living in that part of Newberry Twp.
Which later became a part of Conewago Twp., he was assessed in 1782 for
16 acres of land, 1 horse and 1 cow, his tax was 1 L. 2s. 6d.

Page 3
 
 

They had issue as follows:

(4) Catherine Bentz b. Dec. 5,1783, bapt. August 8,1784, She married
John Frey and together they went west, destination unknown.
(4)Anna Marie Bentz b. November 9,1785, bapt. February 12,1786. She
married a Balmet, believe her home was Mechanicsburg, Pa. Believe she
had a daughter Mary who married a Miller.
(4) Susanna Bentz b. August 9,1799, bapt. September 8,1799, she married
Aug. 1,1816 John Rieser.
(4) Elizabeth Bentz b.June 6,1788, bapt. June 29,1788, she married
George Shettle November 22,1808. They had at least one son, Samuel, who
went West, but later returned. It is thought Albert Shettle at N. York
is a descendent.
(4)Michael Bentz the oldest son of John Peter and Anna, b. April 1,1790
in Conewage Twp. York Co.,Pa., bapt June 7,1790, was married by Rev. Dr.
Schmucker, Apr. 14,1818 to Ann Quickel, daughter of John Quickel and
Elizabeth Brenneman of Manchester Twp. Where  she was born a twin to
Christian Quickel, Dec 5,1802. The Bentz's lived in York, at the second
home west from Duke St. , on Market St.,. where the Yorktown Hotel now
(1944) stands, where he died June 2,1856. She died May 20,1882, both
were buried in Prospect Hill Cemetery, Old section.
(4)John Bentz, son of John Peter and Anna Maria Humerichouse Bentz, was
b. November 21,1792, in Conewage Twp., bapt. May 18,1793, he died April
21,1871 in Manchester Borough. He was married by Rev. Dr. Schmucker
September 18,1823, to Magdalena Blessing, daughter of Philip and Sarah
Kline Blessing of Hellam Twp., York Co., Pa. April 29,1803 and died
February 4,1862. They are both buried in the Lutheran Cemetery at
Manchester , York Co., Pa. May 20,1882, York Penna.
67. Laura Morrison, On line Web pages: my ancestors. Appears to be sourced, but sources are not available on linking to them , large and comprehensive, frequently sited by others researching these lines, http://www.laura.morrison.net/laura.htm, 1882.
68. Email correspondance from Jane, researcher of Bentz line, relying on data from her grandmother and she basing research on John Bentz Hamme. Letter filed under Bentz Family in Reunion Folder. Janes email oliver1250@hotmail.com

This work bases research on notes by John Bentz Hamme in title, found in text under same[born 1862] where  it is said To him we are indebted for this long and interesting family history.
Please note many comments through text indicate this research was done in about 1944 so, as approaches later generations, could indicate contact with then living progeny and relatives of those detailed in the text. In addition the original information shows living status for several entries born as late as the 1870s.
The original work seems to be by John Bentz Hamme in entirity, and the Hamme lines might then be considered most secure

However, No source citations, are provided in source, and I found several minor errors in my direct lines, so Caveat Emptor

Reads in part (Regarding his parents as named and this child)
THE JOHN BENTZ DESCENDANTS AS COMPILED BY JOHN BENTZ HAMME....
(3)John Peter Bentz b. in W. Manchester Twp. September 8,1758 and died
in Conewago Twp. May 6,1823. He married Anna Maria Humerichouse,
daughter of John and Barbara Humerichouse, of Manchester Twp., York Co.,
Pa, where she was born August 13,1761. She died August 7,1842. They are
both buried in the old cemetery at Quickelís Church in Conewago Twp.,
York Co., Pa.

He served as a Private in the American Revolution, in Capt. Simon
Copenheaverís Company, First Battallion of York Co., Associators.  He
saw service with the Flying Camp in New Jersey about Perth Amboy. (see
Prowellís History, p. 273). He also was a private in Capt. Martin
Shetterís Co., Fifth Class, York Co., Militia for the year 1782, (see
Prowellís History,p. 273)

He drew pension in 1818. While living in that part of Newberry Twp.
Which later became a part of Conewago Twp., he was assessed in 1782 for
16 acres of land, 1 horse and 1 cow, his tax was 1 L. 2s. 6d.

Page 3
 
 

They had issue as follows:

(4) Catherine Bentz b. Dec. 5,1783, bapt. August 8,1784, She married
John Frey and together they went west, destination unknown.
(4)Anna Marie Bentz b. November 9,1785, bapt. February 12,1786. She
married a Balmet, believe her home was Mechanicsburg, Pa. Believe she
had a daughter Mary who married a Miller.
(4) Susanna Bentz b. August 9,1799, bapt. September 8,1799, she married
Aug. 1,1816 John Rieser.
(4) Elizabeth Bentz b.June 6,1788, bapt. June 29,1788, she married
George Shettle November 22,1808. They had at least one son, Samuel, who
went West, but later returned. It is thought Albert Shettle at N. York
is a descendent.
(4)Michael Bentz the oldest son of John Peter and Anna, b. April 1,1790
in Conewage Twp. York Co.,Pa., bapt June 7,1790, was married by Rev. Dr.
Schmucker, Apr. 14,1818 to Ann Quickel, daughter of John Quickel and
Elizabeth Brenneman of Manchester Twp. Where  she was born a twin to
Christian Quickel, Dec 5,1802. The Bentz's lived in York, at the second
home west from Duke St. , on Market St.,. where the Yorktown Hotel now
(1944) stands, where he died June 2,1856. She died May 20,1882, both
were buried in Prospect Hill Cemetery, Old section.
(4)John Bentz, son of John Peter and Anna Maria Humerichouse Bentz, was
b. November 21,1792, in Conewage Twp., bapt. May 18,1793, he died April
21,1871 in Manchester Borough. He was married by Rev. Dr. Schmucker
September 18,1823, to Magdalena Blessing, daughter of Philip and Sarah
Kline Blessing of Hellam Twp., York Co., Pa. April 29,1803 and died
February 4,1862. They are both buried in the Lutheran Cemetery at
Manchester , York Co., Pa. Prospect Hill Cemetery, York Co., Penna, old section.
69. Ibid.
70. Ed Morrill did this census look up for me [from email contact]
.
71. Evidences of the Bentz-Pentz Families in York County [PA] Before the Year 1850, By The Historical Society of York County: Henry James Young, A.B., Researcher (1935), http://www.pipeline.com/~richardpence/yorkpa.htm, viewed 051201, also http://www.swiss.ai.mit.edu/~bentz/geneal/bentz/yorkpa.htm, April 1 1790  Birth Given In Baptismal Record In Quickel's Union, Conewago Twp   59. Michael Bense son of Peter & Anna Maria b Ap 1 1790, bp Je 7.  Quickel's Union, Conewago Twp. Tr. by G. R. Seiffert.
72. Ibid. 59. Michael Bense son of Peter & Anna Maria b Ap 1 1790, bp Je 7.  Quickel's Union, Conewago Twp. Tr. by G. R. Seiffert.
73. York County, Pennsylvania, 1765-1803: Quickel's (Zion) Lutheran and Reformed Church.  Lineages, Inc., comp. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000. Records transcribed from Family History Library copies of church records for this locality. For more information, see Family History Library Catalog (FHLC) #0020346.Located in Conewago Township in York County, Pennsylvania, Quickel's Church, also called Zion's Church, was organized in the 1760s. Its records date from 1765. The late William J. Hinke originally translated the records for the years 1765-1842 f rom German to English, and his manuscript has been microfilmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah. The records in this database span from 1755 to 1801 and include the names of more than 5,500 individuals.
Ancestry.com database april 1790 York County Pa.
74. Email correspondance from Jane, researcher of Bentz line, relying on data from her grandmother and she basing research on John Bentz Hamme. Letter filed under Bentz Family in Reunion Folder. Janes email oliver1250@hotmail.com

This work bases research on notes by John Bentz Hamme in title, found in text under same[born 1862] where  it is said To him we are indebted for this long and interesting family history.
Please note many comments through text indicate this research was done in about 1944 so, as approaches later generations, could indicate contact with then living progeny and relatives of those detailed in the text. In addition the original information shows living status for several entries born as late as the 1870s.
The original work seems to be by John Bentz Hamme in entirity, and the Hamme lines might then be considered most secure

However, No source citations, are provided in source, and I found several minor errors in my direct lines, so Caveat Emptor

Reads in part (Regarding his parents as named and this child)
THE JOHN BENTZ DESCENDANTS AS COMPILED BY JOHN BENTZ HAMME....
(3)John Peter Bentz b. in W. Manchester Twp. September 8,1758 and died
in Conewago Twp. May 6,1823. He married Anna Maria Humerichouse,
daughter of John and Barbara Humerichouse, of Manchester Twp., York Co.,
Pa, where she was born August 13,1761. She died August 7,1842. They are
both buried in the old cemetery at Quickelís Church in Conewago Twp.,
York Co., Pa.

He served as a Private in the American Revolution, in Capt. Simon
Copenheaverís Company, First Battallion of York Co., Associators.  He
saw service with the Flying Camp in New Jersey about Perth Amboy. (see
Prowellís History, p. 273). He also was a private in Capt. Martin
Shetterís Co., Fifth Class, York Co., Militia for the year 1782, (see
Prowellís History,p. 273)

He drew pension in 1818. While living in that part of Newberry Twp.
Which later became a part of Conewago Twp., he was assessed in 1782 for
16 acres of land, 1 horse and 1 cow, his tax was 1 L. 2s. 6d.

Page 3
 
 

They had issue as follows:

(4) Catherine Bentz b. Dec. 5,1783, bapt. August 8,1784, She married
John Frey and together they went west, destination unknown.
(4)Anna Marie Bentz b. November 9,1785, bapt. February 12,1786. She
married a Balmet, believe her home was Mechanicsburg, Pa. Believe she
had a daughter Mary who married a Miller.
(4) Susanna Bentz b. August 9,1799, bapt. September 8,1799, she married
Aug. 1,1816 John Rieser.
(4) Elizabeth Bentz b.June 6,1788, bapt. June 29,1788, she married
George Shettle November 22,1808. They had at least one son, Samuel, who
went West, but later returned. It is thought Albert Shettle at N. York
is a descendent.
(4)Michael Bentz the oldest son of John Peter and Anna, b. April 1,1790
in Conewage Twp. York Co.,Pa., bapt June 7,1790, was married by Rev. Dr.
Schmucker, Apr. 14,1818 to Ann Quickel, daughter of John Quickel and
Elizabeth Brenneman of Manchester Twp. Where  she was born a twin to
Christian Quickel, Dec 5,1802. The Bentz's lived in York, at the second
home west from Duke St. , on Market St.,. where the Yorktown Hotel now
(1944) stands, where he died June 2,1856. She died May 20,1882, both
were buried in Prospect Hill Cemetery, Old section.
(4)John Bentz, son of John Peter and Anna Maria Humerichouse Bentz, was
b. November 21,1792, in Conewage Twp., bapt. May 18,1793, he died April
21,1871 in Manchester Borough. He was married by Rev. Dr. Schmucker
September 18,1823, to Magdalena Blessing, daughter of Philip and Sarah
Kline Blessing of Hellam Twp., York Co., Pa. April 29,1803 and died
February 4,1862. They are both buried in the Lutheran Cemetery at
Manchester , York Co., Pa. (June 2,1856) York in his home.
75. BENTZ Related Sourced repository : births, marriages, deaths, baptisms, etc all sourced to location and minister etc, http://www.swiss.ai.mit.edu/~bentz/geneal/bentz/bentz2.rtf., Most entries are sourced, some not as clearly so, JAN. 2,1858  Prospect Hill Tombstone Inscriptions (names and dates):.
76. Old Family Bible (Keller Family Bible), Info provided to Donald McCurdy Swope by Amy Swope Wing from source cited, Mrs Keller of York, York County, Penna?, Donald McCurdy Swope citation 13 Apr 1818.
77. Evidences of the Bentz-Pentz Families in York County [PA] Before the Year 1850, By The Historical Society of York County: Henry James Young, A.B., Researcher (1935), http://www.pipeline.com/~richardpence/yorkpa.htm, viewed 051201, also http://www.swiss.ai.mit.edu/~bentz/geneal/bentz/yorkpa.htm,  90. Ap 13 1818. Michael Benns m Anna Quickel.; Christ Lutheran, York. Translated by H. J. Young.
78. Email correspondance from Jane, researcher of Bentz line, relying on data from her grandmother and she basing research on John Bentz Hamme. Letter filed under Bentz Family in Reunion Folder. Janes email oliver1250@hotmail.com

This work bases research on notes by John Bentz Hamme in title, found in text under same[born 1862] where  it is said To him we are indebted for this long and interesting family history.
Please note many comments through text indicate this research was done in about 1944 so, as approaches later generations, could indicate contact with then living progeny and relatives of those detailed in the text. In addition the original information shows living status for several entries born as late as the 1870s.
The original work seems to be by John Bentz Hamme in entirity, and the Hamme lines might then be considered most secure

However, No source citations, are provided in source, and I found several minor errors in my direct lines, so Caveat Emptor

Reads in part (Regarding his parents as named and this child)
THE JOHN BENTZ DESCENDANTS AS COMPILED BY JOHN BENTZ HAMME....
(3)John Peter Bentz b. in W. Manchester Twp. September 8,1758 and died
in Conewago Twp. May 6,1823. He married Anna Maria Humerichouse,
daughter of John and Barbara Humerichouse, of Manchester Twp., York Co.,
Pa, where she was born August 13,1761. She died August 7,1842. They are
both buried in the old cemetery at Quickelís Church in Conewago Twp.,
York Co., Pa.

He served as a Private in the American Revolution, in Capt. Simon
Copenheaverís Company, First Battallion of York Co., Associators.  He
saw service with the Flying Camp in New Jersey about Perth Amboy. (see
Prowellís History, p. 273). He also was a private in Capt. Martin
Shetterís Co., Fifth Class, York Co., Militia for the year 1782, (see
Prowellís History,p. 273)

He drew pension in 1818. While living in that part of Newberry Twp.
Which later became a part of Conewago Twp., he was assessed in 1782 for
16 acres of land, 1 horse and 1 cow, his tax was 1 L. 2s. 6d.

Page 3
 
 

They had issue as follows:

(4) Catherine Bentz b. Dec. 5,1783, bapt. August 8,1784, She married
John Frey and together they went west, destination unknown.
(4)Anna Marie Bentz b. November 9,1785, bapt. February 12,1786. She
married a Balmet, believe her home was Mechanicsburg, Pa. Believe she
had a daughter Mary who married a Miller.
(4) Susanna Bentz b. August 9,1799, bapt. September 8,1799, she married
Aug. 1,1816 John Rieser.
(4) Elizabeth Bentz b.June 6,1788, bapt. June 29,1788, she married
George Shettle November 22,1808. They had at least one son, Samuel, who
went West, but later returned. It is thought Albert Shettle at N. York
is a descendent.
(4)Michael Bentz the oldest son of John Peter and Anna, b. April 1,1790
in Conewage Twp. York Co.,Pa., bapt June 7,1790, was married by Rev. Dr.
Schmucker, Apr. 14,1818 to Ann Quickel, daughter of John Quickel and
Elizabeth Brenneman of Manchester Twp. Where  she was born a twin to
Christian Quickel, Dec 5,1802. The Bentz's lived in York, at the second
home west from Duke St. , on Market St.,. where the Yorktown Hotel now
(1944) stands, where he died June 2,1856. She died May 20,1882, both
were buried in Prospect Hill Cemetery, Old section.
(4)John Bentz, son of John Peter and Anna Maria Humerichouse Bentz, was
b. November 21,1792, in Conewage Twp., bapt. May 18,1793, he died April
21,1871 in Manchester Borough. He was married by Rev. Dr. Schmucker
September 18,1823, to Magdalena Blessing, daughter of Philip and Sarah
Kline Blessing of Hellam Twp., York Co., Pa. April 29,1803 and died
February 4,1862. They are both buried in the Lutheran Cemetery at
Manchester , York Co., Pa. by Rev. Dr.Schmucker 14 Apr 1818.
79. Appears in IGI Match for North America
Individual Record FamilySearch International Genealogical Index v4.02
 Michael BENNS
Sex: M Marriage(s):
Spouse: Anna QUICKEL
Marriage: 13 Apr 1818
Christ Lutheran Church, York, York, Pennsylvania
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source Information:
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Batch number: Dates Source Call No. Type Printout Call No. Type
M506861 1735-1767 1320516 IT 1-4  Film 1002621  Film
M506861 1801-1807 1320516 IT 1-4  Film NONE
Sheet:
80. Barbara Bucknam Christie, online GEDcom/Homepage, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=barbgeni&id=I04014, 091000, Barbgeni@ix.netcom.com, http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/c/h/r/Barbara-E-Christie/, uncited source, but parents are cited at source below, page 263.
81. Albert H. Gerberich, Brenneman History, The, Copyright 1938, reprinted 1988 By Selby Publ., Selby Publishing and Printin 3405 Zartman Rd, Kokomo, Indiana 46902, cited by source Barbara Christie <barbgeni@ix.netcom.com> Via Rootsweb World Connect Tree Entry, URL for Web pages below:, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=SHOW&db=barbgeni&surname=Alexander%2C+James+Herbert, 090900, parents are cited on page 263.
82. A Biographical History of York County, Pennsylvania. n.p., 1886.//Ancestry.com database Bordered by the Susquehanna River in southeastern Pennsylvania, York County was formed in 1749 from neighboring Lancaster County. This database is a collection of biographical sketches of prominent men from the county in the nineteenth century David S Quickel Bio.
83. Ibid. Henrys own bio.
84. Ibid.
85. Ibid. David S Quickel Bio  Magdelene Strickler.

86. The Gazette: Newsletter of the Mid-Atlantic Popular / American Culture Association December 1999 / January 2000 and citing Barry Rauhauser, then undergraduate winner of MAPACA Conference's  "The Daniel Walden Student Paper Competition"  for his work:  "How the Craftsman Interprets Culture: The Pennsylvanian German Gravestones of Johannes Quickel"
 
 
 
 
 
 

To Our American Immigrants
Within The Vines

Within The Vines Homepage