The Woodson Line :  First Woodson in America: Dr. John Woodson of Fleur de Hundredaaaaaa

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ttp://webpages.charter.net/pepbaker/woodson.htm

The Woodson line is the first known of our American Lines, arriving Jamestown in 1619.
"Flourdieu Hundred or Peirsey's Hundred, is probably named after Temperance FLOWERDIEU wife of Sir George YEARDLEY, VA's first
Governor, who came to Virginia in January 1619 on the same ship with John and Sarah WOODSON. This about the time of the first legislative assembly in Jamestown - July 30, 1619-August 4, 1619. Flowerdieu was represented in the assembly, the first House of Burgesses, by
Ensigne Roffingham and Mr. Jefferson. " John Woodson of Flowerdew Plantation

The Jefferson Papers of the Library of Congress reveal that from 1606 and by 1624
" approximately seventy-three hundred emigrants have sailed for the colony [of Jamestown] , and 6,040 have died either en route or after arrival. However, the Privy Council argues that that the colony has had a net increase of only 275 people since its founding."

James Woodson and his wife Sarah embarked from London on the Ship George in 1619-also present on the ship was Gov Sir Yeardley. Dr Woodson  apparantly went to Jamestown to meet the growing medical needs of the colony. The physician and his wife settled at Fleur de Hundred, a small settlement outside of Jamestown, but associated with the colony and encompassed within its larger geographical radius including other like settlements. They survived the massacre of 1622, had two sons born at Fleur de Hundred in the 1630s, and in 1644, 25 years after arrival, Dr Woodson lost his life in the second Jamestown Massacre, although his wife and sons survived. In the post massacre census of 1623, present with the Woodsons are 6 black Americans. Because of the Woodson family's  remarkable history in the first generation spanning the first black Americans of known origin,  the massacres of Jamestown settlers by the Powhatan Confederacy under Openchancanough, and residency in the first permanent American colony making them among the first 10,000 survivors of colonial British America, several pages are devoted to aspects of their lives.

Associated Pages Within the Vines include:
The Natives of Virginia and the Woodsons ;
The First Black Americans and The Woodsons. and
History of the Jamestown Colony


Map of The Native Americans 
of the Chesapeake region 1600
Map of the Earliest Jamestown 
settlements including Fleur de Hundred
Jamestown Muster Role 1623
The Living and Dead of Virginia  Feb. 16, 1623. [post Indian Massacre of 1622] 
Jamestown Census 1624 
[01 20 1624 Woodson ennumeration ]
Census Lists of early Jamestown
Searchable database at Virtual Jamestown
The first black Americans & the Woodsons
The Native Americans and Dr John Woodson
Maps of Jamestown 1608-1651
Settlement of Virginia 1607-1700
Geneology of Woodson Links: 
The Valentine Papers
Genealogy of the Woodsons and their Connections Vol. 1 
by Henry Morton Woodson,
Published in 1915. 
**caveat emptor. "found with many errors" which  have been corrected at  the next link: 
THE WOODSON FAMILY
States at their site that they 
have corrected the known errors of Harry Morton Woodson's 1915 work, 
and have the documentation to 
back it up.Great Site on Woodson Research

This is how wide we wa

1 John  [Dr] WOODSON1,2
Noteson Woodson Research available on line
Birth: 1585, Dorchester, Devonshire, England [Bristol, Devonshire, England]3,4
Death: 18 Apr 1644, In Indian Massacre; Fleur de Hundred, Henrico County, VA5,6
Father: Alexander [Dr]  WOODSONNE (1554-<1618)
Educ: St. John's College, Oxford 16047
Occupation : Physician [Surgeon]
Immigration: in 1619 on The George to Jamestown with wife and in company of Gov. Sir Yeardley
  • Dr John Woodson  and John Woodson's  wife Sarah came to the New World on the Ship George in company of Governor Sir Yeardley [ under whom,  and less than four months after his arrival in Virginia, was convened the first representative legislative Assembly to

  • meet on American soil at the church in Jamestown, 30 July 1619]. Dr Woodson was a surgeon, and he came apparantly to meet the growing medical needs of the colony, numbering over 1,000 living individuals at the time of his arrival. In the muster of 1624, presented by Virtual Jamestown, he and his wife are found as are details of their provisions. Included in the Feb 1623 post massacre muster  are 21  blacks, 6 of whom are ennumerated in the Woodson household, while there is also the inclusion of one deceased black on the death muster list. These 6 of 22 blacks thus ennumerated are likely persons from the "20 and some odd" blacks listed as disembarking from a Dutch Ship in 1619, the cause of which will be further discussed below [there were however some blacks on the 1619 census before the month of disembarkation of the "twenty and some odd"  blacks of whom Rolfe wrote back to England.
Resided: Fleur de Hundred, Jamestown Settlement [ about 30 miles north of Jamestown on the South Bank of the James. It is also found as Piercey's Hundred. ]
  • Present Census for 1624 Jamestown 
    • 1624  FLOURDIEN HUNDRED    VA  W325  WOODSON        , John
    • 1624  FLOURDIEN HUNDRED    VA  W325  WOODSON        , Sarah
  • "THE MUSTER OF JOHN WOODSON

  • JOHN WOODSON   }
                   } in the George 1619
    SARAH his wife }
    Corne, 4 bushells; Powder, 1 lb; Lead, 3 lob; Peece fixt, 1; Sword, 1.' 
    THE MUSTER OF THE INHABITANTS OF PEIRSEYS HUNDRED TAKEN THE 20TH OF JANUARY 1624


Spouse: Sarah [possibly WINSTON] 13
Marr: Sarah and John WOODSON married bef 1619, Devonshire, England15
Notes on Sarah:

  • Emmigrated England to Jamestown in company of her Husband
  • Death: January 17, 1659/60 [Will proved], Will proved in Henrico County, VA14
  • Notes on Sarah:
    • Present on  the 1623 muster & 1624 census
    • She married 2nd Unknown DUNWELL; Married 3rd  Unknown JOHNSON
    • her will is recorded as Sarah Johnson. The will mentions John Woodson, Robert Woodson, Deborah Woodson, and Elizabeth Dunwell. She is buried at Prince George, Virginia. 
    Children of John Woodson and Sarah, his wife:
    Deborah
    John (1632-1684)
    Robert (ca1634->1716)

     
     
     
     

    EDIT THIS:
    After doing some work on this family I encountered the website of jcschreiber[8 ],  the best Woodson website for these early lines I have yet found, being an extremely objective review of the sources , exhibiting obvious  careful evaluation of inclusion of the individuals in the family based on same,  and incorporating much of what I had found in an easily read and scholarly text.  Please note that the above mentioned writer refers to the blacks present in the Woodson household in the Jamestown  census of 1623 as slaves, as do many of the persons who write on this family in doing their family history.  In any scholarly discussion of the history of Black Americans or the history of Black slavery, there is the inevitable and rightful inclusion of these  first 22 Black Americans [6 of which are found in the Woodson household ] for reasons very obvious.  But most historians agree that those first "20 and some odd" black Americans  were sold in America as indentured just as  white counterparts were similarly sold. The conditions of early indenture in Jamestown is both terribly and best described by a white indentured man of Marin's Hundred , Richard Frethorne, whose letter home to England   details what one would hope to be the worst conditions of indenture encountered.  His letter includes the request that his parents buy his freedom or send him food and  reveals his condition was no better than slavery, and remarkably abusive.
    The evolution of a racially based system of slavery occuring in the short decades after this first sale are briefly discussed in
     The first Black Americans & the Woodsons which also briefly describes the history of slave ownership in our America direct lines, includes direct link to Richard Frethorne's letter home, and other links relevant to this discussion regarding our first Woodson forebears.

     For an excellent synopsis on this first family group, Go to The Woodson Family by  fjcschreiber  8
     
     
     
     
     

    ýNotes From ŰAdventurers of Purse and PersonÝ
    JOHN WOODSON and his wife Sarah came to VA, 1619, in the George and settled at Flowerdew Hundred, known by Feb. 1624/5, when the muster was taken, as Peirsey's Hundred. They had been fellow passengers on the ship with Governor Sir George Yeardley and his wife Temperance Flowerdew, Lady Yeardley. No further documentary evidence has been found relating to them until 1660. a family account written about 1785 by Charles Woodson (1711-~1795), son of Tarleton Woodson, however, survives and supplies details which link the first generations of Woodsons and Robert Woodson, John Woodson, Senr., and John Woodson, Junr." who were among the tithables at Curles, 1679.
    Tradition states that John Woodson was killed in the Indian massacre of 18 April 1644. His children were very young and Mrs. Sarah Woodson soon remarried (2) ___ Dunwell, who died leaving her with a daughter Elizabeth, and (3) ___ Johnson. As a widow again she left a combination inventory and nuncupative will which was recorded 17 Jan 1660/1. This made bequests to John Woodson, Robert Woodson, Deborah Woodson (apparently under age) and Elizabeth Dunwell (under age). John Woodson was the implied executor.
    The family record of 1785, with no evidence to the contrary presented during two centuries, has posited this descent: issue: John, Robert, Deborah, left a cow and a feather bed by her mother, not mentioned in the 1785 account. ý7
    7.  Wayne@Trevilians.com    Wayne G. Dunn? The author is assumed from webmaster pages, and is not given at the tree, ý  a website linked to the Louisa Co., Va Webpage at VAGenWeb Genealogy Project,ţ http://trevilians.com/others/wood1.htm  // URL for main page  http://www.trevilians.com/, This appears to be the webmasterÝs family, and the tree does have some primary material, but is largely unsourced, although the SITE provides links to primary information relevant to the county.
     
     
     
     

    ýDr. John Woodson was born in the year 1586 in Dorchester, Devonshire, England. He married Sarah Winston who was born in the year of 1590, also in Devonshire, England. Dr. John Woodson came to Jamestown as a surgeon with Sir George Yeardly. The young couple embarked on the ship GEORGE, January 29, 1619 and landed in Jamestown, Virginia in April 1619. (This was one year before the Pilgrims landed in Plymouth,Mass. on the Mayflower.)

    Dr. John Woodson located at Flowerdew Hundred (also called Fleur de Hundred, Flour De Hundred, or Piersey's Hundred), which is on the south side of the James River some thirty miles above Jamestown, in what is now Prince George County. Two Woodson sons were born at Flowerdew Hundred; John born in 1632 and Robert born in 1637.

    In 1632, Dr. Woodson was listed as the Surgeon of the Flour De Hundred Colony in Virginia. On April 19, 1644, Dr. Woodson was killed in sight of his house by Indians, who had called him out apparently to see the sick. , (Virginia Genealogist, Vol. 20, 1976, p3-8) After killing him, they attacked his home which was successfully defended by his wife and a shoemaker named Ligon. Ligon killed seven of the Indians with an old muzzleloading gun eight feet long, now one of the prized possessions of the Virginia Historical Society. Mrs. Sarah Woodson killed two Indians who came down the chimney; One with boiling water and one with a roasting spit. The boys, John and Robert, were concealed during the attack under a tub and in a potato pit, respectively.

    The Indians were led by Chief Opechancano, who was the son of Powhaten and had killed 300 settlers on April 18, the day before. Opechancano had also led the Massacres of 1622 at Martin's Hundred. Several weeks later Opechancano was captured by the colonists and executed. The Indians were permanently driven out of that part of Virginia as a result of the uprisings of 1644.

    Dr. John Woodson is the progenitor of the Woodson Family in America. Among his descendants are Dolley Todd Madison, wife of President James Madison and the famous outlaw Jesse Woodson James.

    Sources:

    Genealogies of Virginia Families, From the William and Mary Quarterly HistoricalMagazine, Volume V, Thompson-Yates (and Appendix), Baltimore,
    Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1982

    Virginia Genealogist, Vol. 20, 1976, p 3-8 Historical Genealogy of the Woodsons and Their Connections, Compiled by Henry Morton Woodson of Memphis,
    Tenn., Published in 1915, pgs 21, 23

    IMMIGRANT ANCESTORS, by Frederick Adams Virkus, Volume 7, page 75: "Woodson, Dr. John (1586-1644) Grad. St. John's College, Oxford 1604,

    ADVENTURES OF PURSE AND PERSON, by Virginia M Meyer & John F Dorman ý11
     

    Notations below entirely From Steve & Natalie FlemingÝs Webpages 1(Excellent)
    ýŢNotes for John Woodson:
    IMMIGRANT ANCESTORS, by Frederick Adams Virkus, Volume 7, page 75:
    "Woodson, Dr. John (1586-1644) Grad. St. John's College, Oxford 1604, came in 'George' 1619 as surgeon to a company of soldiers. Settled at Fleur de Hundred on James River. Killed in indian massacre. m. Sarah Winston."
    "There are many stories told about these Woodson, like the one about Dr. John Woodson and his family in April 1644. There was an Indian uprising during which the savages made a sudden attack on Fleur de Hundred. Dr. Woodson, returning from visiting his patients was killed as he returned home. His wife and two children were alone in the house with the exception of an old schoolmaster. Their only weapon was a huge old- fashioned gun which the schoolmaster used so effectively that at the first fire he killed three Indians and at the second, two. Meanwhile two Indians tried to come down the chimney to the house. Mrs. Woodson seized a pot of boiling water from the fire and scalded the first; she snatched up the iron spit from the fireplace and with it brained the second. The howling savages began to retreat, but the schoolmaster fired a last shot, killing two more of the enemy.
    Then the mother called the two little boys from their hiding places: the ten-year old had been concealed under a large wash tub and the twelve-year old crawled out from a hole in which potatoes were stored in winter.
    Even today when there is a gathering of Woodsons, a favorite question is, 'Are you a wash-tub Woodson or a potato-hole?' ý1
    We descend from the Potato Hole Woodsons, through son Robert.

    Notations below entirely from TrevilianŢ. a website linked to the Louisa Co., Va Webpage at VAGenWeb Genealogy Project
    ýNotes From ŰAdventurers of Purse and PersonÝ
    JOHN WOODSON and his wife Sarah came to VA, 1619, in the George and settled at Flowerdew Hundred, known by Feb. 1624/5, when the muster was taken, as Peirsey's Hundred. They had been fellow passengers on the ship with Governor Sir George Yeardley and his wife Temperance Flowerdew, Lady Yeardley. No further documentary evidence has been found relating to them until 1660. a family account written about 1785 by Charles Woodson (1711-~1795), son of Tarleton Woodson, however, survives and supplies details which link the first generations of Woodsons and Robert Woodson, John Woodson, Senr., and John Woodson, Junr." who were among the tithables at Curles, 1679.
    Tradition states that John Woodson was killed in the Indian massacre of 18 April 1644. His children were very young and Mrs. Sarah Woodson soon remarried (2) ___ Dunwell, who died leaving her with a daughter Elizabeth, and (3) ___ Johnson. As a widow again she left a combination inventory and nuncupative will which was recorded 17 Jan 1660/1. This made bequests to John Woodson, Robert Woodson, Deborah Woodson (apparently under age) and Elizabeth Dunwell (under age). John Woodson was the implied executor.
    The family record of 1785, with no evidence to the contrary presented during two centuries, has posited this descent: issue: John, Robert, Deborah, left a cow and a feather bed by her mother, not mentioned in the 1785 account. ý12
     


    Children [of Sarah [Possibly WINSTON] and John WOODSON]:


    1.1 Deborah WOODSON16,12


    ýThe family record of 1785, with no evidence to the contrary presented during two centuries, has posited this descent: issue: John, Robert, Deborah, left a cow and a feather bed by her mother, not mentioned in the 1785 account.ţ17



    1.2 John WOODSON 18,38, 1,19
    ˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇ
    Birth: 1632, Fleur de Hundred, Henrico County, VA20
    Death: Sep 1684, Fleur de Hundred, Henrico County, VA20
    Will Abstract of John Woodson: Alias: John Woodson Sr21
    Spouse: Sarah TUCKER1, 37
    Marr: 165420
    Children:

     

    1.3 Robert  WOODSON23,12
    ˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇˇ
    Birth: 1634 [based on depos, ca 1634], Fleur de Hundred, Henrico County, VA [James Town, Prince George County, Virginia]24,25

    ýRobert Woodson, Sr. aged about 61 yrs. Deposition of, relative to an affair between Francis Sampson and Thomas East. Sworne in Court June 1, 1695 & recorded. Vol. 1688-97 , p. 585.ţ32 [From  The Valentine Papers]
     

    ýROBERT WOODSON deposed, June 1680,that he was "46 years of age or thereabouts," and, 1 June 1696, that he was aged about 61." From 'Adventurers of Purse and Person ' ţCitation and  text from Wayne@Trevilians.com 12

    Death: 171626, 27, after 1 oct 170727,28, Fleur de Hundred, Henrico County, VA26,27,28 [valentine Papers states between 1707-1711]
    Resided:  apparantly resided Curles Plantation with father in law & older brother John in 1689; lived in Varina Parish, Henrico County29 Occupation: Planter
    Public Service:  The only public service recorded of him is that of surveyor of highways in Henrico County in 1685
    Will: there is no remaining record of his will or of admnistration on his estate
    Spouse: Elizabeth  FERRIS34,12 Marr: abt 1651, Henrico Co, Va36
    Children:
     
     
     
     
     
     

    From Descendants of John Woodson Webpages:
    ý3. ROBERT2 WOODSON (DR JOHN1) was born 1634 in Fleur de Hundred, Va, and died 1707 in Va. He married ELIZABETH FERRIS 1656 in Curles Plantation.
    Notes

    Source: THE GEORGIANS by Jane Austin, AAI CD100

    Source: Genealogies of Virginia Families, From the William and Mary Quarterly Historical Magazine, Volume V, Thompson-Yates (and Appendix), Baltimore,
    Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1982

    THE GEORGIANS by Jane Austin - "From Historical Genealogy of the Woodsons and Their Connections, Page 23: 'Robert was born, according to his own
    deposition, in the year 1634, at Fleur de Hundred, on the south side of James river, in what is now Prince George County, Virginia...It was here that the family lived
    at the time of the massacre by the Indians on the 18th of April 1644, when Robert and his elder brother were saved by being thrust into a pit made for the purpose
    of keeping Potatoes; from which circumstance their descendants, for several Generations, bore the sobriquet 'Potato Hole Woodsons'."
     
     

    Children of Robert Woodson and Elizabeth Woodson are:

                        i. JOHN3 WOODSON, b. 1658, va; m. JUDITH TARLETON WOODSON.

                        ii. ROBERT WOODSON, b. 1660 ; m. (1) SARAH LEWIS m. (2) RACHEL WATKINS

                        iii. RICHARD WOODSON, b. 1662; m. ANN SMITH

                        iv. JOSEPH WOODSON, b. 1664.

                        v. BENJAMIN WOODSON, b. 1666

                        vi. SARAH WOODSON , b. 1668; m. EDWARD MOSELEY.

                        vii. ELIZABETH WOODSON , b. 1670; m. WILLIAM LEWIS.

                        viii. JUDITH WOODSON b. 1673; m. WILLIAM CANNON.

                        ix. MARY WOODSON , b. 1678. Md GEORGE PAYNEţ11

    From The WOODSONNE webpages
    ýCol. Robert Woodson was born in the year 1634, at Fleur de Hundred.  At an early age, about the year 1656, he married Elizabeth, the daughter of Richard Ferris, later spelled Farris, of Curles. "She was descended from an ancient Norman family, Henri de Ferriers of Gascony."  In American Ancestry, Vol. VII, is the following statement:  "The Ferris Family of England, was originally from Leicestershire, descended from Henri de Ferriers, son of Gwalchelme de Ferriers, Master of Horse to the Duke of Normandy."

       There is a grant of 1785 acres of land 21 October, 1687, to Mr. Robert Woodson, Mr. Richard Ferris, Mr. Giles Carter, William Ferris and Roger Comins, at  White Oak Swamp on the north side of the James River in the Parish of Varina.

    Robert Woodson, in 1707, made a deed to grandson, William Lewis, Jr. and Joseph Lewis.

      The date of his death is not known, but it was shortly after making this deed, as he was about seventy-three at that time.  He is frequently spoken of as Colonel Robert Woodson.  If he held the military rank of Colonel, it was of course by authority of the British Government, as the entire colony was under British Control    at that time.

    Written and Researched by Adelle Bartlett Harperţ33
     

    Children:
    John** (~1658-1715)
    Robert (~1660-1728)
    Richard (~1662-~1722)
    Joseph (~1664-1735)
    Benjamin [descent to Jesse James] (~1664-1723)
    Sarah (~1668-)
    Elizabeth (~1670-)
    Judith (~1673-)
    Mary [Descends to Dolley Madison] (~1678->1744)
     
     

    Sources

    1. Steve & Natalie Fleming (ýboth members of the National Genealogical Societyţ), Excellent Citations,  ýWelcome To "Someday"    Steve & Natalie Fleming's Home Page,ţ http://users.erols.com/someday/.
    2. ýWOODSONNE  FAMILY,ţ http://www.oedgs.com/woodsonpedigree.htm.
    3. cited by Source:  1.Ţ Genealogies of Virginia Families, From the William and Mary Quarterly Historical Magazine, Volume V, Thompson-Yates (and Appendix), Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1982;
    Citation from Steve & Natalie Fleming (ýboth members of the National Genealogical Societyţ), Webpages: ýWelcome To "Someday"    Specific URL :  http://users.erols.com/someday/Woodson.html.
    4. ýWOODSONNE  FAMILY,ţ http://www.oedgs.com/woodsonpedigree.htm, [Bristol, Devonshire, England].
    5. date, place: cited by source:   Genealogies of Virginia Families, From the William and Mary Quarterly Historical Magazine, Volume V, Thompson-Yates (and Appendix), Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1982 .
    This citation from Steve & Natalie Fleming (ýboth members of the National Genealogical Societyţ),  Webpages: ýWelcome To "Someday" Specific URL http://users.erols.com/someday/Woodson.html.
    6. Ibid. event  : cites IMMIGRANT ANCESTORS, by Frederick Adams Virkus, Volume 7, page 75.   Specific URL : http://users.erols.com/someday/Woodson.html.
    7. Ibid. cites IMMIGRANT ANCESTORS, by Frederick Adams Virkus, Volume 7, page 75 .
    Specific URL:   http://users.erols.com/someday/Woodson.html.
    8. ýThe Woodson Family,ţ The best of the Woodson sites yet encountered, the evaluation of sources and documentation extremely careful, Part of JC's Genealogy Home Page, Home URL http://www.jcsisle.com/index.html, jcschreiber@attbi.com © Copyright 1999 by JCSGEN.Ţ Specific URL :  http://www.jcsisle.com/woodson.html.
    9. The Chronology of Black Slavery Webpage   mail@innercity.org webmaster   [see description of source following its address.]
     http://www.innercity.org/holt/slavechron.html
    Source self description: ýCompiled from Archive, library and Internet source documentation, this timeline on Slavery and in part the History of Racism, has been used to guide the direction of independent research into the history of enslaved Americans of African descent at historic sites located at the National Zoo, in Washington, DC. Hopefully, this compilation of American history will help others who undertake similar tasks. This project has been conducted totally independently from research conducted by the Office of Architectural History and Preservation at the Smithsonian and the National Zoo.ţ
    10. The 1623/4 census for Jamestown. Link to source on web ftp://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/va/jamestown/census/1624cens.txt.
    11. ýDescendants of Dr John Woodson,ţ sourced site, some very good detail, http://members.aol.com/SHelveston/table.html, Main Page URL http://members.aol.com/SHelveston/home.html.
    12.  Wayne@Trevilians.com    Wayne G. Dunn? The author is assumed from webmaster pages, and is not given at the tree, which itself is  ý  a website linked to the Louisa Co., Va Webpage at VAGenWeb Genealogy Project,ţ  URL for main page  http://www.trevilians.com/,
    Description of Source: This appears to be the webmasterÝs family, and the tree does have some primary material, but is largely unsourced, although the SITE provides links to primary information relevant to the county.
    Specific URL for entry: http://trevilians.com/others/wood1.htm
    13. Presented as Sarah WINSTON. in Steve & Natalie Fleming (ýboth members of the National Genealogical Societyţ), provides at most levels EXCELLENT Citations, ýWelcome To "Someday"    Steve & Natalie Fleming's Home Page,ţ http://users.erols.com/someday/
    14. Ibid. cites Virginia Marriage Records   http://users.erols.com/someday/Woodson.html.
    15. Ibid. cites Virginia Genealogist, Vol. 20, 1976, p 3-8 Historical Genealogy of the Woodsons and Their Connections, Compiled by Henry Morton Woodson of Memphis, Tenn., Published in 1915, pgs 21, 23   http://users.erols.com/someday/Woodson.html.
    16. Ibid. Benjamin H. Branch, Jr., The Branch, Harris, Jarvis, And Chinn Book,  (1963)    http://users.erols.com/someday/Woodson.html.
    17.  cited by source:  "Adventurers of Purse and Person"
    Source: Wayne@Trevilians.com    Wayne G. Dunn? The author is assumed from webmaster pages, and is not given at the tree, which itself is  ý  a website linked to the Louisa Co., Va Webpage at VAGenWeb Genealogy Project,ţ  URL for main page  http://www.trevilians.com/,
    Description of Source: This appears to be the webmasterÝs family, and the tree does have some primary material, but is largely unsourced, although the SITE provides links to primary information relevant to the county..http://users.erols.com/someday/Woodson.html.
    18. Will of John Woodson, Mentioned as ýCousin John Woodson, Srţ.
    The Valentine Papers, Vol 1-4, 1864-1908; Woodson Family
    Ţ Ibid. p. 169.ţ Mentioned as ýCousin John Woodson, Srţ.
    19. Notes on John Woodson-transcribed by me from source given in link. Please note that there appear to be some errors in the text at the level of ýjohn srţ in terms not of data, but family grouping.
    Military Records: Virginia in the Revolution and War of 1812nbsp Available from Genforum Library Subscription
    Virginia Soldiers of 1776, Vols. I, II amp III, Virginia Soldiers, Page 806
    Notes on John Woodson-transcribed by me from source. Please note that there appear to be some errors in the text at the level of ýjohn srţ in terms not of data, but family grouping.
    ýThe woodson family was Quaker. John Woodson was the only one who prior to the Revolutionary war figured at all conspicuously in political life. He was vestryman, magistrate, member of the House of Burgesses, and of the Revolutionary conventions. He ws sheriff in Henrico Co 1778 and 1789 and COunty Lieutenant 1779.
    This John Woodson was the son of josiah, and was born about 1730; died 1789. He resided in Goochland Co. and married Dorothea, daughter of Isham Randolph of the same county. Dorothea was the grandaughter of William Randolph ofnbsp ýTurkey Island, ý Henrico CO.
    Josiah Woodson died in Goochland county, 1735, a comparatively young man. He was the son of John and Judith (Tarleton) Woodson, whose other sons were ; John (died in Goochland 1754 without children), Tarleton (of Chesterfield Co., Űwho clung to the faith of his fathersÝ) and Stephen Woodson (died in Goochland 1736).
    John Woodson, the elder, of Henrico Co was born 1632; died 1688. He was a brother orf Robert Woodson. The sons of John, the elder, were: Robert and John.
    Johnnbsp Woodson, Jr was a staunch Quaker. He marriednbsp Mary, the daughter of Samuel Tucker, a shipÝs Captain and his wife Jane Larcum. Jane Larcum later married John Pleasants.
    John and Mary )Tucker) Woodson left three children: Joseph, Samuel, and Jane who married her cousin Robert, son of Robert and Elizabeth Woodson.ţ
    20. cited by source:   Virginia Genealogist, Vol. 20, 1976, p 3-8
    Source for Citation: Steve & Natalie Fleming (ýboth members of the National Genealogical Societyţ), EXCELLENT Citations, ýWelcome To
    Steve & Natalie Fleming (ýboth members of the National Genealogical Societyţ), wepages ýWelcome To "Someday"    Steve & Natalie Fleming's Home Page,ţ http://users.erols.com/someday/,
    Specific URL: http://users.erols.com/someday/Woodson.html.
    21.mentioned as Cousin John Woodson Sr.in the Will of John Woodson
    The Valentine Papers, Vol 1-4, 1864-1908. Woodson Family
    22. Steve & Natalie Fleming (ýboth members of the National Genealogical Societyţ), EXCELLENT Citations, ýWelcome To "Someday"    Steve & Natalie Fleming's Home Page,ţ http://users.erols.com/someday/,
    Specific URL: http://users.erols.com/someday/Woodson.html#3.
    23. Ibid. http://users.erols.com/someday/Woodson.html#4.
    24. Ibid. "1634 Fleur de Hundred, Henrico County, VA"  cites  THE GEORGIANS by Jane Austin, AAI CD100   specific URL: http://users.erols.com/someday/Woodson.html#4.
    25. Deposition 1695 age @ 61ýRobert Woodson, Sr. aged about 61 yrs. Deposition of, relative to an affair between Francis Sampson and Thomas East. Sworne in Court June 1, 1695 & recorded. Vol. 1688-97 , p. 585.ţ Found in the Valentine Papers
    26. "1716  f leur., Hen." Cited by Source: Genealogies of Virginia Families, From the William and Mary Quarterly Historical Magazine, Volume V, Thompson-Yates (and Appendix), Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1982
    Source for Citation:
    Steve & Natalie Fleming (ýboth members of the National Genealogical Societyţ), Webpages:  ýWelcome To "Someday"    Steve & Natalie Fleming's Home Page,ţ http://users.erols.com/someday/
    Specific URL : http://users.erols.com/someday/Woodson.html#4.
    27. "after 1 Oct 1707, also gives 1716 in Fleur de Hundred, Henrico "
    Given by Wayne@Trevilians.com    Wayne G. Dunn? The author is assumed from webmaster pages, and is not given at the tree, which itself is  ý  a website linked to the Louisa Co., Va Webpage at VAGenWeb Genealogy Project,ţ  URL for main page  http://www.trevilians.com/,
    Description of Source: This appears to be the webmasterÝs family, and the tree does have some primary material, but is largely unsourced, although the SITE provides links to primary information relevant to the county.
    Specific URL for entry: http://trevilians.com/others/wood1.htm.
    28. Valentine Papers
    States ýHenrico County sometime between 1707 and 1711 ; but, there is no remaining record of his will or of admnistration on his estate.ţ
    URL: http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?&db=valentinepapers&ti=0&gss=angs&ct=17238.
    29.  "resided Curles Plant with f in law and older brother John in 1689"  Link to source on web
    30. Henrico Division of Recreation and Parks, ýNames and Places in Henrico County,ţ http://www.co.henrico.va.us/rec/namelist.htm#CURLES%20NECK%20FARM.
    31. Valentine Papers
    Reads ýThe 'descent' with which this note is concerned is from Robert Woodson (circa 1634 -circa 1707-11 ).ţ
    32. Valentine Papers
    33. ýWOODSONNE  FAMILY,ţ http://www.oedgs.com/woodsonpedigree.htm, http://www.oedgs.com/woodsonrobert2.htm.
    34. "Elizabeth Ferris." Steve & Natalie Fleming (ýboth members of the National Genealogical Societyţ), webpages, ýWelcome To "Someday"    Steve & Natalie Fleming's Home Page,ţ http://users.erols.com/someday/,
    35. ýSouth Alabama Roots and Branches; Ancestry tree,ţ no sources, but more detail on places indicating church records (ie for marriages),  webmistress: Mary Stearnes Henley <marjoe@mon-cre.net>,
    Specific URL: http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=marjoeal&id=I01528.
    36. cited by Source:  Genealogies of Virginia Families, From the William and Mary Quarterly Historical Magazine, Volume V, Thompson-Yates (and Appendix), Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1982.
    Source for Citation: Steve & Natalie Fleming (ýboth members of the National Genealogical Societyţ), ýWelcome To "Someday"    Steve & Natalie Fleming's Home Page,ţ http://users.erols.com/someday/
    36 VIRGINIA CENTER FOR DIGITAL HISTORY The Dolley Madison Project; The life letters and legacy of Dolley Payne Madison Main page http://moderntimes.vcdh.virginia.edu/madison/index.html
    37. "He married Sarah Tucker 1654 (Source: Virginia Genealogist, Vol. 20, 1976, p 3-8)." Cited at ýDescendants of Dr John Woodson,ţ sourced site, some very good detail. Main Page
    Specific URL: http://members.aol.com/SHelveston/table.html
    38. John WOODSON Will dated 20 Aug 1684, proved 1 Oct 1684. Cited by sources above a) 22 [cites: THE GEORGIANS by Jane Austin] ,  and b) 11[cites: Virginia Genealogist, Vol. 20, 1976, p 3-8] , with both giving abstract revealing   sons, John and Robert; and Robert's children, Jane and Samuel; and also his brother Robert's children, John, Robert, Richard, Joseph, and Benjamin